Sociology and Anthropology (SOA)

SOA-110:  The Sociological Imagination  (3 Credits)  

This introductory course presents the student with a critical analysis of the basic sociological perspectives, common concepts, prevalent theories, and widely used research methodologies. Using a number of sociological theories, a variety of pressing national and global social issues are critically analyzed.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Defining the American Experience.  
SOA-130:  Anthropology: Interpreting Cultural Differences  (3 Credits)  

Anthropology is a holistic approach to the study of peoples across time and space with an emphasis on cultural diversity. Students will be introduced to four sub-fields within anthropology, specifically, physical anthropology, linguistics, cultural anthropology, and archeology. Students will explore diverse topics ranging from the origin and timing of human evolution, to the effects of globalizing popular culture in non-western societies.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
SOA-190:  Introduction to Archeology  (3 Credits)  

Archaeology is a sub-discipline of anthropology that utilizes the material remains of everyday life to explore the past. While Archaeologists engage with many of the same issues as cultural anthropologists (e.g., social inequality, identity, colonialism), they must approach these issues from alternative perspectives using different research methods. In this course, students will consider how archaeologists formulate research questions, find and excavate archaeological sites, analyze artifacts and interpret data in order to form understandings about life in the past.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
Cross-listed with: CHP-190 and AST-190.  
SOA-200:  The Social Fabric: Language in Society  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): LIN-245 is recommended.  

This course delves into issues in language and culture from a linguistic perspective. It explores the complex intersections of language, culture, race, ethnicity, and gender through social interactions and their dynamics. Students learn about and discuss the tools and techniques that inform inquiry in these frameworks in order to better understand issues of language and inequality, language and power, language ideology, and the construction of social relationships. Students also consider language change, including language shift, pidgins, creoles, and language endangerment.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
SOA-211:  Race and Ethnic Relations  (3 Credits)  

This course is an introduction to the sociological study how majority and minority groups based on race, ethnicity and nationality emerge, interact, and are influenced by institutions such as economy, politics, media, education, health care, and the criminal justice system. Race relations transcend national boundaries, and immigration and migration flows are a major dynamic historically and in the contemporary social landscape.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
SOA-218:  Exploring North American Indigenous Cultures  (3 Credits)  

This course provides an introduction to North American Indian societies. The class takes an anthropological approach that explores diversity in the cultural practices and material culture of Native American groups across the continent. Course topics will include adaptation to the environment, belief systems, gender roles, architecture and European colonialism. Students in the course will also engage with modern issues facing Native American communities such as heritage preservation and environmental, economic and social justice.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Defining the American Experience.  
Cross-listed with: CHP-218.  
SOA-219:  Popular Culture  (3 Credits)  

Popular culture represents the form of creative expression we use in everyday life. This course will present basic theories and approaches to the scholarly study of popular culture, focusing on the ways in which popular culture reflects the values of our society. The effect of various mass media (TV, film, recording industry, print, radio) on modern American culture and the movement of popular culture around the world will also be explored.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Defining the American Experience.  
SOA-230:  Gender and Sexuality: Cross-Cultural Perspectives  (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to investigate how sexuality in various parts of the world intersects with economics, politics, and social conditions. We will ask such questions as: Is sexuality culturally constructed or biologically determined? How do notions of the erotic differ within and between cultures? Do young people 'come of age' the same way all over the world? What is the relationship between sexuality and practices? What are the conditions under which the state might control or restrict sexual practices? How do anthropologists research human sexuality?

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
SOA-249:  Global Health: Society, Medicine, and the Body  (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to explore and analyze the social contexts of health, illness, and the body. We will investigate how anthropologists and sociologists approach health and disease from a bio-cultural understanding. For instance, how do sociocultural systems shape perceptions of the body, disease patterns and notions of healing? How do healing systems vary across cultures? How are infectious diseases shaped by political and economic factors? Analysis of how Western medical sciences influence our understanding of the body will also be studied.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
SOA-260:  The Anthropology of Human Rights  (3 Credits)  

The anthropological study of human rights is an appropriate course to offer in an increasingly globalized world. Given Salve Regina's mission to seek universal justice it is imperative to help our students understand that building a discourse on universal human rights is an initiative that requires multiple perspectives. This course will help students appreciate the tensions that arise between respecting cultural differences and norms and working toward an international human rights movement.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
SOA-311:  Social Theory  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): SOA-110 or SOA-130 and junior or senior academic standing are required.  

This course presents the student with an introduction to the nature of sociological theory and the major theoretical developments that have shaped the fields of sociology and anthropology. Emphasis is placed upon major theorists, their biographies, and the intellectual traditions which influenced their development, as well as each theorist's contribution to the field. Particular attention is given to the pertinence of theory and to the understanding of social systems, culture and change in the contemporary world.

SOA-320:  "Sex" at "Work"  (3 Credits)  

Most of us spend an inordinate amount of time in organizations as worker, clients, citizens and consumers. The ways in which gender relations shape organizations and their actors - and how organizations shape gender - are significant areas of inquiry in the social sciences. In this course, we will link classic organizational literature to current articulations, including fiction and film, to analyze the intersections of gender and sexuality with race, class, disability and occupational status in organizational contexts and how these relations shape other areas of our lives.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
SOA-335:  Global Capital  (3 Credits)  

Cultures worldwide participate in and are affected by the new global cultural economy. In this class we will explore the effects of flows of people, technology, finance, and information on local cultures around the world with an emphasis on struggles for justice. We will cover a range of issues including the changing economies of the global South, the rise of ethnic conflicts and nationalism, the effects of mass media, and global environmentalism. Understanding the logic of the modern capitalist world system will be central to our analysis of these issues. Sophomore or higher academic standing is required.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
SOA-350:  Food Matters  (3 Credits)  

Human cultures, social institutions, individuals' lives and the natural environment are all interrelated in the production, distribution, preparation and sharing of food. Over time food has also become defined as a commodity rather than an individual right, ensuring that some segments of our global community encounter food insecurity sporadically or as a chronic condition of their lives. In this course, we explore "food matters" through a sociological lens, focusing on both the significance of food and the environmental and social consequences of contemporary food-related policies and practices.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: Building Global Awareness.  
SOA-390:  Field School  (3-6 Credits)  

A summer program which offers a field school in archaeology. Students participate in all aspects of the archaeological process, beginning with developing a research design, continuing with survey, excavation and documentation, and concluding with cataloguing of recovered materials

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
Theme: What is Western Heritage?-Ancient and Modern.  
SOA-399:  Special Topics  (3 Credits)  

These courses provide opportunities for introduction of specialized, in-depth study of specific subject areas in Sociology and Anthropology.

SOA-420:  Gender Violence  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): SOA-110, SOA-130, WGS-200 or permission of instructor is required.  

In this course, we explore the complex interrelationships among gender, sexuality and violence. Building on historical and theoretical understandings of the cultural and social-structural foundations of gender violence, we will study topics such as sexual harassment, rape, intimate partner violence, and the use of gender violence in war. Current and potential responses to gender violence in communities, organizations and public policy will be studied both in the literature and in our local community.

Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences.  
SOA-491:  Internship  (1-6 Credits)  

This course allows students to apply their skills and knowledge outside the classroom while gaining practice work experience at an approved agency.

SOA-499:  Independent Study  (1-3 Credits)  

Course work arranged for majors to pursue avenues of learning outside the existing offerings of the department.