Holistic Counseling (HLC)

HLC-500:  Research Methods  (3 Credits)  

Using a culturally competent approach to research, students explore various research techniques and apply that knowledge to an analysis of existing research in order to design and implement their research projects. The course includes preparing appropriate research questions, a literature review, qualitative and quantitative approaches, research designs, threats to internal and external validity, sampling techniques, data collection methods, and ethical considerations. A basic overview of the application of research methods to program evaluation is provided. Ethical and cultural issues are explored in some depth.

Cross-listed with: RHB-500.  
HLC-504:  Holistic Foundations  (3 Credits)  

This is the foundation course for the holistic graduate programs. Fundamental program concepts, which will be elaborated and expanded upon in subsequent courses, are presented here. The course focuses on the emergence of an integrative perspective as it applies to the development of western science and philosophy within counseling and leadership as distinct disciplines. It examines how attitudes, beliefs, and epistemological have influenced professional practice in counseling and leadership. The course further traces how recent changes in scientific assumptions have affected a shift in both research and professional practice and considers the implications of this shift. Ethics and a holistic or integrative orientation related to these professions are introduced. Non-matriculating students are permitted to take this course.

HLC-505:  Interpersonal Helping Skills  (3 Credits)  

The course experience provides the opportunity to explore one's basic communication style of interacting with others both verbally and non-verbally. Through practice in dyads, and/or the whole class, students learn and apply basic interpersonal helping skills such as listening, primary accurate empathy, immediacy, the art of challenging, and appropriate self-disclosure - effective professional skills in for the counseling and leadership professions. Non-matriculating students are permitted to take this course if space is available.

HLC-506:  Professional Orientation and Ethics  (3 Credits)  

This course is an introduction to the profession of counseling including: professional identity, history, accreditation, licensure, organizational structure, advocacy and use of technology. The class also focuses on cultural considerations and the ethical problems in counseling with specific attention given to the American Counseling Association Code of Ethics. This course should be taken in the beginning portion of the students' program of study.

Cross-listed with: RHB-506.  
HLC-507:  The Body/Mind Connection  (3 Credits)  

This course will focus on defining, experiencing, and working with the body-mind connection. Current research findings in neuroscience, modalities, and techniques that affect the body-mind connection and somatic therapeutic processes will be explored. This course is essential for holistic clinical mental health counselors and holistic leaders to integrate the mind-body perspective into their work. Non-matriculating students are permitted to take this course. This course should be taken in the first year. This course should be taken in the beginning portion of the students' program of study.

HLC-508:  Human Growth and Development  (3 Credits)  

The course is designed to address the understanding of human growth and development across the life span. The course emphasizes the interwoven nature of development domains (physical, cognitive, social, spiritual, and emotional) and the contextual factors influencing each. The critical nature of cultural implications within human development are explored. Theoretical, practical, and research perspectives will be examined as they apply to the counseling professions. This course should be taken in the beginning portion of the students' program of study.

Cross-listed with: RHB-508.  
HLC-509:  Theories of Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-504 and HLC-505 or permission of program director are required.  

This course includes the conceptual study of the theoretical underpinnings of selected historical and modern counseling theories. These theories will be explored related to personality development, cultural relevance, client maturation, and the change process Specific theoretical interventions within various theories will be explored. Students will begin to conceptualize how theory, personhood, and cultural development are intimately connected in an effort to identify the theory(ies) that resonate with their counseling style.

Cross-listed with: RHB-509.  
HLC-510:  Cultural Awareness in Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Co-requisite(s): HLC-508 is required.  

This course explores a wide variety of issues within counseling from an intrapersonal to a systemic level and asks students to examine the lens through which they see themselves and others, especially when working in a counseling environment. The class investigates how human intersectionality, privilege, and oppression impact the counselor/client relationship. This course focuses on counselor-in-training awareness and understanding around cultural elements, the importance of meeting clients where they are, gaining skills in working with a variety of clients, and understanding the role of a professional counselor.

Cross-listed with: RHB-510.  
HLC-512:  Evaluation Research  (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to familiarize students with ways to evaluate theories, hypotheses and methodologies, both qualitative and quantitative, pertinent to understanding human behavior and development. Emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking skills and applying them to specific areas of student research interests. Students may take HLC-500 in place of HLC-512.60 credit HCMHC students should take HLC-500 instead of HLC-512. 48 credit students may take HLC-500 or HLC-512.

HLC-513:  Couple and Family Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-504, HLC-505, and HLC-508 are required. Holistic Counseling students are strongly encouraged to take HLC-509 prior to HLC-513.  

This course focuses on couple and family culture, structure and process, the systemic life cycle, and the relationship between the family unit and its environment. The impact of culture and society are discussed throughout the course. Students will gain an understanding of how the family system impacts the individual as well as larger systems. Ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and varying definitions of family are discussed.

Cross-listed with: RHB-513.  
HLC-515:  Assessment and Treatment Planning  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-504, HLC-505, and HLC-507 are required.  
Pre/Co-requisite(s): HLC-509 is required.  

Students learn foundational concepts of assessment, treatment planning, and clinical interviewing methods. Through reading, class discussion, and solving case studies, students practice identifying and assessing the psychological, cultural, psychosocial, and behavioral factors that cause dysfunction in individuals and family systems. Students learn how to set goals and make plans that integrate clinical and holistic models that address symptoms, support the whole person, and promote optimal functioning and well-being. This course introduces psychometrics and common assessment formats to enable a student to arrive at a DSM-5 diagnosis. This course increases clinical decision making through traditional evidence-based theories, body-centered psychotherapies, and process-oriented models for treatment.

Cross-listed with: RHB-515.  
HLC-516:  Group Counseling and Group Work  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-504, HLC-505, HLC-507 and HLC-509 or permission of program director are required.  

This course will provide a framework to view group development as it applies to the field of mental health counseling. The course will provide practical experiences in group process, group interventions, and group facilitation. Students will learn to identify different group types, establish group norms, understand the evolution of a typical group, and become familiar with ethical issues and standards of practice in group work. Students will explore the various implications culture and society has on group development. Students will practice leading a group under supervision in the classroom.

Cross-listed with: RHB-516.  
HLC-517:  Career Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-508 is required.  

This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct career counseling to provide insight and direction to clients' vocational goals. Students will examine career development theories, sources of occupational and educational information, life-style and career decision-making processes, and assessment instruments.

Cross-listed with: RHB-517.  
HLC-518:  Appraisal  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-508, HLC-509, HLC-515 and HLC-510 are required.  

This class explores the theoretical basis for assessment and counseling techniques from a historical foundation perspective. It explores legal, ethical, and diversity issues. Specifically, this course will explore validity and reliability, psychometric statistics, and test construction. In addition, how tests are used to assess personality, behaviors, types of intelligence, aptitudes, achievement and career choices will be explored. Students learn how to choose and implement appropriate assessments for individuals, couples, and families. This course will also address crisis intervention and how to use assessments to evaluate risk and implement clinical skills and resources.

Cross-listed with: RHB-518.  
HLC-523:  Understanding Substance Use Disorders: The Science and Application  (3 Credits)  

This course addresses substance use disorders, substance abuse, and addictions throughout the human lifespan. Theories and etiologies of substance abuse are reviewed, along with pertinent information regarding commonly abused substances. Effective, evidence-based substance use disorder assessments, treatment modalities, and treatment settings are reviewed as a relevant part of treatment continuum. Students will be provided with a foundational understanding of substance use disorder counseling and will engage with the historical and systemic dynamics that contribute to substance use disorders. Students will challenge commonly held biases and beliefs regarding substance use and abuse, and apply an equitable, wellness-based, and socially just approach substance abuse counseling.

HLC-524:  Identification of Special Populations within the Context of Substance Use Disorders  (3 Credits)  

This course will explore ways in which to identify, understand, and serve the needs of diverse populations when working with those diagnosed with or suspected to have a substance use disorder. Students will learn how to apply the knowledge gained in the Substance Use Disorders Counseling Certificate program to actual populations.

HLC-528:  Understanding Trauma in Counseling  (1 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-504, HLC-505, HLC-506, HLC-507, HLC-508, HLC-509, HLC-510 and HLC-515 are required.  

Students learn how neurobiological, environmental, biological predispositions, and psychological stressors contribute to the experience of trauma. This course presents the latest research in traditional and body-centered counseling modalities, cultural consideration; accessing community support; and self-care for clinicians who treat this population.

HLC-535:  Introduction to Expressive Sound and Music  (1 Credits)  

This foundation course serves as an introduction to the uses of Expressive Sound and Music as a vehicle for growth and transformation. Through exercises and discussion, the course will explore how Expressive Sound can be utilized to help release tensions, express emotions, and calm the nervous system. The in-class experiences will draw upon various sound-based modalities, including: breathing practices, vocal toning, deep listening, rhythm explorations, and improvisation as part of an intermodal expressive arts approach. This course also introduces ways to begin to adapt and utilize these practices with others in a variety of professional settings, including counseling, psychotherapy, education, healthcare, the arts, and the corporate environment. This course is one of the three prerequisite foundation courses for the CAGS/CGS in the professional application of the expressive and creative arts, along with HLC-582 and HLC-584.

HLC-540:  Integrating Meaning  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-504, HLC-505, HLC-506, HLC-507, HLC-508, HLC-509, HLC-510, HLC-550, HLC-551, HLL-519, HLL-520, HLL-524, HLL-527, HLL-528 and HLL-529 or permission from program director is required.  

This course is predicated on research indicating a direct correlation between physical and mental health and one's sense of personal meaning and connectedness to a larger purpose. Students gain awareness of how various world views, cultures, backgrounds, and personal perspectives define meaning and purpose and of how to respectfully practice culturally competent skills for work with clients and/or within a family or place of employment. The course also provides practical tools and techniques with which to assist others to explore similar questions of meaning in their lives, work, organizations, communities, and world-wide. This course is to be taken in the final semester for students in the Holistic Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program and Leadership Dynamic and Practice Program.

HLC-550:  Advanced Helping Skills  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-504, HLC-505, HLC-506, HLC-507, HLC-508, HLC-509, and HLC-515 are required.  

This course helps students integrate what they have learned in previous course work and develop more advanced skills as counselors-in-training. Students continue to hone how to define issues, clarify goals, implement specific theoretical orientations, and help clients achieve their goals. Students will continue to explore the role culture and systems play in client's experience and the counselor/client relationship. Students' will gain practice refining their counseling skills, providing feedback, their own and conceptualizing client cases. Increasing attention is paid to the student's self-awareness and emotional responses. This class will also discuss finding clinical placement sites.

HLC-551:  Practicum in Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-504, HLC-505, HLC-506, HLC-507, HLC-508, HLC-509, HLC-510, HLC-515, and HLC-550 are required.  

Practicum is the student's first clinical field experience. The requirements for this course are fulfilled in a community-based counseling facility and a weekly university seminar. Students begin to develop and apply their counseling skills and abilities in clinical settings. The in-the-field experience consists of approximately 10 hours a week of direct and indirect field experience for a total of 100 clinical-hours and a weekly seminar class. The clinical placement site must be approved by the program. Students will work with a qualified on-site supervisor who will provide site supervision and evaluate the student's counseling skills, preparation, and professionalism in the field. The course instructor will provide a weekly seminar, supervision, assessment, and support. The primary supervision will come from the on-site supervisor. Qualifications for appropriate Site Supervisors are found within the Practicum Agreement. Students are expected to participate in the program's pre-requirements before starting practicum.

HLC-575:  Healing and Transformation  (2 Credits)  

This theoretical and practical course emphasizes the potential for every human being to heal and change. The course will examine scientific and anthropologic writings on healing as well as how professionals can act as supportive agents in the change process.

HLC-578:  Body and Personal Myth: A Jungian Perspective  (3 Credits)  

This course will explore the relationship between archetypal images, the body and personal myth. Based on the work of Carl G. Jung, the course will introduce and expose students to a basic understanding of depth psychology through the use of myth and metaphor.

HLC-579:  Grief Counseling  (2 Credits)  

This course discusses current information, skills, and strategies for counseling interventions specific to various aspects of the grief process. This will include acute, sustained, and ambiguous grief. Students are strongly encouraged to take HLC-506/RHB-506 before taking the Grief Counseling course.

HLC-581:  Special Topics  (1-3 Credits)  

Special topics course offered periodically during the academic year.

HLC-582:  Introduction to the Expressive and Creative Arts As Transformation  (3 Credits)  

This foundation course explores the use of the expressive and creative arts as a therapeutic and educational tool for transformation, self-discovery, physical healing, and the evolution of consciousness. Using the body-mind's inner language of imagery, students will learn how to access, release and transform nonverbal sensate impressions of feelings and emotions through a variety of integrative arts processes, including drawing, image-making, and collage. As students experience the energetic shifts that occur in the body-mind when imagery is used to express inner states of awareness, they will begin to understand how thoughts, feelings and emotions can affect the body/mind/spirit. Through hands-on exercises, students will begin to recognize how the expressive arts can help support intra-personal and inter-personal development on many levels. This course also introduces ways to begin to utilize the transformative process with others in a variety of professional settings including, counseling, psychotherapy, education, medical caregiving, the arts, and the corporate environment. This course is one of the three prerequisite foundation courses for the CAGS/CGS in the expressive and creative arts, along with HLC-535 and HLC-584.

HLC-584:  Movement, Creativity Consciousness: An Introduction  (2 Credits)  

This two-credit course will introduce a variety of experiences to help students to develop a clearer understanding of the body/mind/spirit connection; to increase awareness of the creative, psychological and spiritual potential as revealed through the body; and to begin to develop an understanding of each person's unique resources and responsiveness through movement. Movement as an expression of a path toward increased somatic awareness will be explored as part of an intermodal expressive arts approach. Students will also begin to explore ways of working with others in the fields of counseling, education, psychotherapy, and other helping professions to help individuals and groups integrate more embodied modalities into their work. This course is one of the three prerequisite foundation courses for the CAGS/CGS program in the professional applications of the expressive and creative arts, along with HLC-535 and HLC-582.

HLC-587:  Gender and Human Sexuality in Counseling  (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop a knowledge base regarding the theories and research about gender, sex, and sexuality. Biological, cognitive, psychological, spiritual, and emotional components related to gender, sex, and sexual and affectional orientation will be explored. The course is offered periodically at the program's discretion.

HLC-588:  Working With Young People  (3 Credits)  

This course utilizes counseling and developmental theories, creativity, and research to cultivate therapeutic skills in assessing and treating young people. In doing so, the course discusses cultural and systemic factors that impact child development and growth. The course is offered periodically at the program's discretion.

HLC-590:  Internship and Seminar I  (3 Credits)  
Pre/Co-requisite(s): HLC-504, HLC-505, HLC-506, HLC-507, HLC-508, HLC-509, HLC-510, HLC-513, HLC-515, HLC-516, HLC-517, HLC-581, HLC-550 and HLC-551 are required.  

Student interns will practice clinical counseling skills in clinical field placements approved by the internship coordinator. The requirements for this course are primarily fulfilled in a community-based mental health counseling facility. Students begin to develop and apply their counseling skills and abilities in clinical settings. This class is the first part of a two-semester clinically supervised experience. This class requires 300 direct and indirect field hours and an on-campus weekly seminar. Students are required to obtain professional liability insurance coverage to participate in this course. Requirements for this class are subject to change based on RI LMHC licensure requirements.

HLC-591:  Internship and Seminar II  (3 Credits)  

In the second semester of clinical internship, student interns will practice clinical counseling skills in clinical placements approved by the internship coordinator. The requirements for this course are primarily fulfilled in a community-based mental health counseling facility. At this level of training, students work on the more advanced and nuanced skills and various professional responsibilities in their clinical field placement settings. This class requires 300 direct and indirect field hours and an on-campus weekly seminar. Students are required to obtain professional liability insurance coverage to participate in this course. Requirements for this class are subject to change based on RI LMHC licensure requirements.

HLC-592:  Arts, Nature and Eco-Consciousness  (1 Credits)  

The Arts, Nature and Eco-Consciousness is an integrative learning course, presented in an experiential-learning, workshop format. The class presents foundational material on Deep Ecology, Eco-Psychology, and the role of the creative process in renewing our connection with the environment. The class will emphasize a holistic approach to embodied creative arts processes that reflect the interconnectedness of all life within the earth's community. It will also encourage self-exploration through image making and creative expression (visual arts, sound, movement & theatre arts). The class also presents foundational material on the philosophies of important visionaries in the field of human-nature relationships. Through a hands-on approach to self-expression and reverential ecology, participants will be able to apply the concepts presented in their personal and professional life, in a variety of settings including counseling, education, coaching and community organizations. Permission of program director is required.

HLC-600:  Career Counseling  (3 Credits)  

This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct career counseling aimed at providing insight and direction to clients' vocational goals. Students will examine theories of career development, sources of occupational and educational information, life-style and career decision-making processes, and assessment instruments. This course challenges the popular conception that what one does to earn money must remain separate from one's personal goals and values and focuses on the successful integration of life and career. This is a required course for the CAGS in mental health.

HLC-601:  Cultural Awareness in Counseling  (3 Credits)  

This course explores a rich variety of issues in counseling that are important in understanding persons of a race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age or ability different from that of the counselor. Consonant with the overall orientation of the program, students are invited to explore both the diversity among experiences and common experiences that unite all peoples. Assumptions of the dominant culture about healthy functioning individuals and families are examined in the light of the great cultural variety found throughout the world. This course invites students to examine their own lens through which they see others, especially when they are working in a counseling environment. This is a required course for the CAGS in clinical mental health.

HLC-604:  Self Discovery Through the Expressive and Creative Arts  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-582 or completion of Expressive Arts Institute is required.  

This course is designed to provide students with experiential opportunities for creative self-discovery using various integrated expressive arts modalities, focusing primarily on image-making and visual arts. In addition, it offers discussion segments that explore the importance for our time and culture of engaging our connection to our own individual creativity and inner wisdom, and the effect doing this can have on the growth of personal as well as collective consciousness. One key premise of the course is that each of us is born creative and that being creative is the nature of being alive. Another key premise is that, in order to be effective in integrating the use of art, creativity and image-making in any educational, therapeutic, business or other professional settings, it is critical to explore one's creative process, development, and style. Accordingly, the principal emphasis of the course is on individual work using personal process, in-class discussions, outside assignments and an independently designed project to develop a self-discovery creative/visual journal. This course is offered in a hybrid format, involving weekend experiential intensives along with guided study time for personal and professional integration. This course is required for the CAGS/CGS in the professional applications of the expressive and creative arts. Any student who would like to register for this course prior to acceptance into the CAGS/CGS expressive and creative arts program would need specific permission of the program coordinator.

HLC-610:  Expressive Theater Arts and Movement: A Multi-Modal Approach to Creativity and Transformation  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-582, HLC-584, and HLC-535 are required.  

In this course, students have an opportunity to do hands-on experiential work in the expressive and creative arts as applied to a variety of fields including counseling, education, healthcare, and other helping professions. The emphasis will be on the modalities of expressive movement and theater arts, with the integration of visual arts and writing interwoven as part of the multi-modal approach. A fundamental premise of this course is that the embodied practices of movement and theater arts provide a vital avenue of expression for the inner self. In addition, the multi-modal approach will create opportunities to reflect upon the ways that one mode of expression informs another, so a deeper understanding of the interplay of modalities, as an intermodal process, will be another area of learning. This course is offered in a hybrid format, involving weekend experiential intensives along with guided study time for personal and professional integration. This course is required for the CAGS/CGS in the professional applications of the expressive and creative arts. Any student who would like to register for this course prior to acceptance into the CAGS/CGS expressive and creative arts program would need specific permission of the program coordinator.

HLC-611:  Group and Individual Applications of the Expressive and Creative Arts  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-582, HLC-584, and HLC-535 are required.  

This course will explore central concepts and approaches to using the expressive and creative arts with groups and individuals along with the integration and application of this work, applied to a variety of fields including counseling, education, healthcare, and other helping professions. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about the application of experiences with the expressive and creative arts in various settings, and will consider applications for a variety of group, individual and community levels. Students will learn how to design and implement a program with appropriate uses of various arts modalities, as part of an intermodal arts approach, including movement, sound, writing and the visual arts. In a specific area of professional interest, students will develop a proposal for a program demonstrating the benefits to a specific group or community. This course is offered in a hybrid format, involving weekend experiential intensives along with guided study time for personal and professional integration. This is designed to be one of the final required courses in the CAGS/CGS program and it is advised to have completed at least several other 600-level courses in the Expressive and Creative Arts. To register for this expressive and creative arts CAGS/CGS course requires permission of the Program Coordinator.

HLC-613:  Expressive Writing for Personal Growth And Transformation  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-582 is required.  

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and applications of expressive writing as a transformational tool that can facilitate emotional, physical and spiritual healing as well as self-discovery, personal growth and conflict resolution. The course will focus on how expressive writing can be used with others in counseling, psychotherapy, healthcare, the arts, education, and the corporate environment. In this course, students will learn how to adapt and integrate expressive writing into their own professional areas of specialization through class discussions and in-class writing exercises that emphasize an intermodal expressive and creative arts approach to writing. This course is offered in a hybrid format involving weekend experiential intensives along with guided study time for personal and professional integration. This course is required for the CAGS/CGS in the Professional Applications of the Expressive and Creative Arts. Any student who would like to register for this course prior to acceptance into the CAGS/CGS Expressive and Creative Arts Program would need specific permission of the program coordinator.

HLC-615:  Utilizing Expressive Sound/Music and Theater Arts - for Creativity and Healing  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): HLC-535 is required.  

This expressive arts course will deepen one's understanding of the realms of expressive sound, music and rhythm as a means of personal growth, community-building and healing. The specific focal points for the course will include: vocal explorations and toning, elements of music for self-discovery and community-building, creativity and music, and recreational music making. We will also incorporate the practice of deep listening and mindfulness as a touchstone for the explorations. The course combines theory with practical exercises that demonstrate how to integrate them into programs for healing and education, as utilized in a variety of settings. Students will learn how to adapt and integrate elements of expressive sound and music into their professional areas of specialization, including counseling, psychotherapy, medical caregiving, the arts, education, and the corporate environment, through discussions and the utilization of sound and music-based exercises that emphasize an intermodal arts approach. This course is offered in a hybrid format, involving weekend experiential intensives along with guided study time for personal and professional integration. This course is required for the CAGS/CGS in the professional applications of the expressive and creative arts. Any student who would like to register for this course prior to acceptance into the CAGS/CGS expressive and creative arts program would need specific permission of the program coordinator.

HLC-620:  Theory and Overview of Substance Use Disorders and Treatment  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): MA in Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, equivalent MA in Healthcare or other counseling degree programs from an accredited institution. HLC-509, HLC-515, HLC/RHB-516 or the equivalent courses from an accredited institution or by permission of the program director are required.  

This course will provide the knowledge to develop competency to apply best practices in the Treatment of Substance Use Disorders. The course will identify regional treatment needs and available recovery support resources.

HLC-621:  Ethics and Confidentiality in Substance Use Disorders  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): MA in Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, equivalent MA in Healthcare or other counseling degree programs from an accredited institution. HLC-509, HLC-515, HLC/RHB-516 or the equivalent courses from an accredited institution or by permission of the program director is required.  

This course will allow students to explore ethical questions in areas such as boundary issues, general communication rules and regulations, utilization of electronic communications, cultural competence, professional competence, risk management, and other ethical and confidentiality considerations related to working with those who have substance use disorders.

HLC-622:  Neuroscience of Chemical Dependency  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): MA in Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, equivalent MA in Healthcare or other counseling degree programs from an accredited institution. HLC-509, HLC-515, HLC/RHB-516 or the equivalent courses from an accredited institution or by permission of the program director is required.  

This course will provide an understanding of brain anatomy, neurotransmission, and the impact of psychotropic substances on the brain. The selection of effective treatment interventions will also be explored.

HLC-623:  Treating Substance Use Disorders: Effective Interventions for Healing  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): MA in Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, equivalent MA in Healthcare or other counseling degree programs from an accredited institution. HLC-509, HLC-515, HLC/RHB-516 or the equivalent courses from an accredited institution or by permission of the program director is required.  

This course will introduce and analyze the holistic environment and clinical competency necessary for individual treatment planning and implementation for those with substance use disorders. This experiential course allows students to apply science and theory by practicing evidence-based interventions that support the continuum of healing for this disease.