Rehabilitation Counseling (RHB)

RHB-500:  Research Methods  (3 Credits)  

In this interdisciplinary course students explore various research techniques and then apply that knowledge to an analysis of existing research and to designing and implementing their own research projects. Students from several different social science disciplines develop and share their projects from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course includes preparation of appropriate research questions, a literature review, qualitative and quantitative approaches, research designs, threats to internal and external validity, sampling techniques, data collection methods, and ethical considerations. A basic overview of the application of research methods to program evaluation is provided. Ethical issues in research are explored in depth. Recommended to be taken in the third or fourth semester in the program.

RHB-505:  Foundations of Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling  (3 Credits)  

This foundation course provides an understanding of the historical, legislative and philosophical roots for the treatment of people with disabilities as well as knowledge of the rehabilitation and mental health delivery system. The role and function of mental health counselors is explored, including the role of the rehabilitation counselor as an advocate for people with disabilities and the role of other professions. This knowledge is essential for effective practice consistent with the intent of the profession which is to assist individuals with mental health issues and co-occurring disabilities to achieve work, independent living and inclusion in society. This course acquaints students with the standards of practice and the ethical guidelines for mental health rehabilitation counseling. Opportunity is provided for students to examine attitudes and values related to mental health treatment, disability issues and the role of public policy.

RHB-506:  Professional Orientation and Ethics  (3 Credits)  

Introduction to the profession of counseling: history, accreditation, licensure, organizational structure, advocacy and use of technology. Ethics problems in counseling with specific attention given to the American Counseling Association Code of Ethics and the Council on Certification of Rehabilitation Counseling Code of Ethics.

Cross-listed with: HLC-506.  
RHB-508:  Human Growth and Development  (3 Credits)  

The course is designed to broaden understanding of human growth and development across the life span with emphasis on the interwoven domains of development (physical, cognitive, social, spiritual, and emotional) and the contextual factors influencing each. Issues related to disability, gender and culture are considered. Particular attention is paid to the effect of the individual's overall level of development in the counseling process and the distinction between pathology and developmental crises. To understand better their clients and themselves, students are encouraged to explore their own growth process, transitions and critical developmental moments.

Cross-listed with: HLC-508.  
RHB-509:  Counseling and Personality Theory  (3 Credits)  

Building on the basic interviewing and assessment skills, the student will study the major counseling theories and the related theories of personality development. This course provides the opportunity to examine the following theoretical perspectives to human development: psychodynamic, developmental, existential, person-centered, behavioral, rational-emotive, cognitive-behavioral, reality based, gestalt, systems theories and post-modern approaches. Emphasis is placed on exploring both counselor and client characteristics that may influence the helping process such as gender, age and ethnicity. Relevant research and application of the theories are explored.

Cross-listed with: HLC-509.  
RHB-510:  Cross-Cultural Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508, RHB-509 and RHB-513 are required.  

This course explores a rich variety of issues in counseling to understanding human intersectionality and assumptions of the dominant culture, persons of a race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age or ability different from that of the counselor. Students are invited to explore both the differences and commonalities among human experiences. This course asks students to examine the lens through which they see others, especially when they are working in a counseling environment.

Cross-listed with: HLC-510.  
RHB-513:  Couples and Family Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508 and RHB-509 are required.  

The course traces the history of systems theory as it evolved within several disciplines and how it is applied to the treatment of couples and families. Students explore multiple theories that frame the foundation for practice with families including general systems theory. Students focus on family culture, family structure and process, the family life cycle, and the relationship between the family and its environment. Issues of ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and varying family forms are discussed.

Cross-listed with: HLC-513.  
RHB-515:  Assessment and Treatment Planning  (3 Credits)  

Students learn foundational concepts of assessment, treatment planning, and clinical interviewing methods. Through reading, class discussion, and solving case studies, students practice how to identify and assess the psychological, cultural, psychosocial, and behavioral factors that cause dysfunction in individuals and family systems. Students learn how to set goals and make plans that integrate clinical and holistic models that address symptoms, support the whole person, and promote optimal functioning and well-being. This course introduces psychometrics and common assessment formats to enable a student to arrive at a DSM-5 diagnosis. This course increases clinical decision making through traditional evidence-based theories, body-centered psychotherapies, and process-oriented models for treatment.

Cross-listed with: HLC-515  
RHB-516:  Group Counseling and Group Work  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508, RHB-509, and RHB-510 are required.  

The study of small groups is multi-faceted and cuts across many social science disciplines. This course provides a framework through which to view group development as it applies to the helping professions. The course will provide practical experiences in group process, group interventions, and group facilitation. Students learn to identify different group types, establish group norms, understand the evolution of a typical group, and become familiar with ethical issues and standards of practice in group work. Students practice leading a group under supervision in the classroom, also.

Cross-listed with: HLC-516.  
RHB-517:  Career Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508 or HLC-508, RHB-509 or HLC-509, and RHB-510 or HLC-510 are required.  

Students study the major career development theories and decision-making models and discuss the implications of these theories and models toward understanding functional capacity. Students learn the importance of the concept of a career ladder as it fits into job placement and career interests of the individual. Career assessment tools and techniques are explored including the impact of gender, disability and culture in using such tools. Students develop knowledge of labor market information and multimedia and other electronic resources for career counseling. Topics for discussion include reasonable accommodations, informed choice, assistive technology, functional capacity, benefits analysis and work incentives. Students identify other significant life components that may impact careercounseling outcomes including work environment, family, multicultural, gender, and health issues.

Cross-listed with: HLC-517.  
RHB-518:  Appraisal  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508 or HLC-508, RHB-509 or HLC-509, RHB-510 or HLC-510, and RHB-540 are required.  

Specific evaluative tools are examined including intelligence, ability, achievement, interests, attitudinal, and personality Specific evaluative tools are examined including intelligence, ability, achievement, interests, attitudinal, and personality instruments along with situational assessment and observation procedures. Students develop an understanding of psychometric statistics including reliability and validity. Students approach evaluation from a holistic assessment of the individual. Ethical, cultural and social factors are considered with emphasis on a comprehensive understanding of the functional capacity of the individual. Students develop the capacity to evaluate, select, administer, and interpret appropriate assessment instruments to use in the context of a counseling relationship.

Cross-listed with: HLC-518.  
RHB-520:  Practicum I and Seminar: Motivational Interviewing  (3 Credits)  

Students participate in a seminar focused on developing competency in Motivational Interviewing (MI). Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening and reflecting skills. The impact of age, gender, disability and ethnic diversity on the counseling process is explored. MI is a directive, client-centered counseling style for eliciting behavior change. Students learn how to help clients examine and resolve their ambivalence to make change. Through dyadic and triadic work students learn and practice the techniques of MI and adopt its spirit as a facilitative style for developing interpersonal relationships. Motivational Interviewing is recognized by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration as an evidence-based practice. It is a method of guided conversation designed to enhance motivation for positive change. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be deemed competent in a SAMHSA evidence-based practice.

RHB-521:  Practicum II and Seminar  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508, RHB-509, RHB-520, RHB-540, and RHB-542 are required.  

This is the first of several CACREP required clinical classes. The counseling practicum fosters professional growth, knowledge and skills development along with an awareness of the counseling process and issues that affect service delivery for clients. It is the student's first immersion experience in a clinical setting. Students are expected to complete a minimum of 20 hours per week (300 hours for the semester) in the field as a counselor intern, supervised by an on-site counselor approved by the University. Students participate in a required weekly seminar, present clinical cases, submit tapes for review and journals reflecting their experiences. Students develop skills related to case conceptualization, case documentation, case management and case referral and services.

RHB-527:  Substance Use Disorders Counseling and Treatment  (3 Credits)  

Differing types of substances are explored along with the treatments used to assist clients in achieving their recovery, improve their wellness and maintain their commitment to sobriety. Students examine the effectiveness of the structures and systems for substance use treatment. Students become more informed with issues related to co-dependency. The application of relevant counseling theories is explored. Discussions occur evaluating the implications of substance use and employment, independent living and inclusion. Substance use as part of co-occurring disorders is examined.

RHB-540:  Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Chronic Illness and Disability  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508, RHB-509, and RHB-510 are required.  

Counselors need expertise concerning the medical aspects of disabilities when working with clients with mental health issues. Clients typically experience a variety of co-occurring medical and functional issues that impact their ability to achieve wellness, independence and have a good quality of life. Major types of disabilities are examined and explored in relationship to the psychosocial impacts of a disability for the clients. The implications of chronic illnesses on clients' functioning in their personal, social, occupational and independent living are examined. Students acquire working knowledge of the use of community resources and the medical knowledge to work with interdisciplinary teams to assist in the development of appropriate individualized rehabilitation treatment plans. Students develop an understanding of the basis for the diagnostic and prognostic judgments in assessing a client's functional capacity.

RHB-550:  Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508, RHB-509, RHB-513, RHB-540, RHB-518 are required.  

Rehabilitation counseling is a growing profession that views clients from a holistic perspective while assessing their mental health, developmental, cognitive, emotional and physical disabilities. Rehabilitation counselors have specialized knowledge and expertise related to disability that differentiates the profession from other counselors. It enables counselors to provide integrated care that addresses all aspects of the clients' lives. Students develop the skills for building rapport with clients to support the development of their individual rehabilitation/treatment or employment plans. Students examine societal trends and attitudes toward people with disabilities and developments in rehabilitation counseling on a national and international level. Topics of study for this course include caseload management, case referral, service coordination, advocacy, team participation, managed care, cost containment and ethical principles in the context of providing rehabilitation counseling services.

RHB-570:  Internship I and Seminar  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508, RHB-509, RHB-513, RHB-518, RHB-521, RHB-540, RHB-550 and RHB-510 are required.  

This class is part one of two clinical classes that fulfill the CACREP requirements for internship. Students work for 300 hours in community organizations in the role of rehabilitation counselor interns and attend a weekly seminar to discuss and process experiences, examine ethical practice, and further develop the counseling skills and knowledge for professional practice. The agency experience must be primarily focused on providing direct rehabilitation and mental health counseling services for 10-15 clients. The experience and should include group work as well as individual one to one counseling services. The internship must be supervised for an average of one hour per week by a MA level counselor who meets the University requirements for a supervisor. Students are expected to actively participate in the seminar through discussion, review of audio tapes of counseling sessions with the instructor, writing in their reflective journals about their experiences, and reading research and applying research to improve clinical practice.

RHB-571:  Internship II & Seminar  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-508, RHB-509, RHB-510, RHB-513, RHB-518, RHB-521, RHB-540, RHB-550 and RHB-570 are required.  

This class is part two of two clinical classes that fulfill the CACREP requirements for internship. The class further develops the students' clinical competencies in trauma informed care, working with families, career counseling clinical assessments and treatment planning. The students work in the field for 300 hours in community organizations in the role of a rehabilitation counselor intern and attend a weekly seminar to discuss experiences, examine ethical practice, and further develop their counseling skills and knowledge for professional practice. The agency experience must be primarily focused on providing direct rehabilitation and mental health counseling services for a caseload of 15 or more clients. The experience should include group work as well as individual counseling services. The internship must be supervised for an average of one hour per week by a MA level counselor who meets the University requirements for a supervisor. Students are expected to actively participate in the seminar through discussion, review of audio tapes of counseling sessions with the instructor, writing in their reflective journals about their experiences, and reading of research and applying research to improve clinical practice.

RHB-581:  Special Topics  (3 Credits)  

Special topics courses related to rehabilitation and addictions counseling content are offered on an annual basis.

RHB-603:  Psychopharmacology Mental Health  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-570 is required.  

This course will examine the fundamentals of drug pharmacology and drug interactions. Lectures will review current psychotropic medication protocols as well as herbal and nutraceutical complements to psychotherapy and therapeutic interventions.

RHB-608:  Advanced Internship I and Seminar: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-515 and RHB-570 are required.  

This seminar provides a comprehensive overview of past and current psychotherapeutic approaches with the primary focus being placed on the cognitive behavioral, evidence -based therapeutic intervention, Dialectic Behavioral Therapy (DBT) that is used for treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) as well as other mental health related issues. Students gain familiarity and insight into the practical application of this intervention through discourse and subsequent practice with fieldwork application. Additionally, this seminar addresses principles of crisis intervention for people with mental health disabilities during crises, disasters and trauma -causing events. Students learn to implement effective crisis assessment tools for clients that are in overwhelming emotional turmoil and recommend the appropriate clinical intervention(s) based upon the aforementioned tools. Students are required to complete a minimum of 500 hours over a four month period as a clinical rehabilitation and mental health counselor intern. Students must be supervised one hour per week under the supervision of a MA level licensed on-site counselor approved by the University.

RHB-609:  Advanced Internship II & Seminar: Trauma Informed Care  (3 Credits)  
Pre-requisite(s): RHB-515 and RHB-570 are required.  

This course is a second four month period of advanced internship. Students continue to work as a clinical rehabilitation and mental health counselor-intern for a minimum of an additional 300 hours. Students must be supervised one hour per week under the supervision of a MA level licensed on-site counselor approved by the University. This seminar provides students with a comprehensive overview of treating traumatic stress disorders to include discussion of etiology and conceptualization as well as familiarization of relevant assessment measures and appropriate therapeutic interventions for clinicians to apply in individual or community-based practice. Select trauma impacted populations which are discussed in detail include: survivors of sexual/emotional/physical abuse, combat, natural disasters, terrorism, serious mental illness and unexpected loss and bereavement. Students develop a case formulation and treatment plan specifically applicable for a trauma survivor population that can be used to serve as a practical template to be adopted for subsequent use. Students formally present this formulation and plan to their peers during a class presentation.