2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    May 18, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Theatre Arts

  
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    THE245: Concepts of Design

    1 Credit(s)
    This course studies academic and applied concepts of art with respect to the basic principles of art as they apply to design. Emphasis on the application of the fundamental principles of artistic design including form, line, contrast and color in a two dimensional medium.
  
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    THE261: Public Speaking: Theory and Practice

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Visual and Performing Arts
    Using the connection between writing and speaking, this course provides an introduction to informative and persuasive speech. Basic vocal training is covered. Students research, create and organize presentations using multi-media. This is a course for non-majors.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    THE265: Stage Combat

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will cover the fundamental techniques of stage combat including hand-to-hand, single blade, rapier-dagger, broadsword and found-object weapons. Historical context and the history of personal combat will be covered. In addition, slapstick comedy, basic tumbling and elementary juggling will be introduced. Special attention will be paid to the unique acting and directing problems presented by stage combat.
  
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    THE301: Scene Study: Classical Theatre

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on intensive script analysis and performance of scenes and soliloquies from plays that demand a heightened performance style. The focus will be on the major plays of the Greek, Medieval, Renaissance and Shakespearean periods, together with readings in acting theory. Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required. Videos, visiting lectures and field trips. Enrollment limited to 16 students.
    Prerequisite(s): THE102  and THE 202  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    THE302: Advanced Acting

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on advanced script and character analysis and performance of monologues and scenes from the 20th century theatrical canon. Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.
    Prerequisite(s): THE 202  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    THE310: Design Skills

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the student to the techniques used by stage designers during the design process. Emphasis on drafting, drawing and rendering techniques as they apply to the design process.
  
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    THE311: Introduction to Scenic Design

    3 Credit(s)
    This course stresses the function of the visual aspects of design for the stage with emphasis on the roles of scene and lighting as they relate to the script and the production as a whole. Emphasis on process and communication techniques used by the designer to communicate with other artists and the audience through visual imagery. Videos, visiting lectures and field trips.
  
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    THE312: The Collaborative Experience

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on the collaborative relationship between actor, director, playwright and designers. Students discover how creating new work together results in exciting theatrical events.
  
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    THE318: Stage Management

    3 Credit(s)
    Students will learn the craft of theatrical stage management including Actor’s Equity standards. Crew work on department productions is required.  Course is repeatable.
  
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    THE320: Acting in Film and Television

    1 Credit(s)
    This course is a practical exploration of the basic elements of the film actor’s craft using existing film and TV scripts. Exercises are filmed and critiqued regularly so that students learn how this medium requires skills that are both similar and different to stage acting.
  
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    THE334: The History and Use of Costume on the Stage

    3 Credit(s)
    The theoretical and practical aspects of costuming for the theatre are covered though a lecture-laboratory format. How costume affects the movement and character of the actor is explored as is the history of fashion and theatrical costuming. Students will be required to work as costume crew on the semester’s scheduled productions. Enrollment limited to 16 students.
  
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    THE343: Theatre for Children and Youth

    3 Credit(s)
    Students in this course will create a theatre piece and perform it for young audiences. The history and theory of children’s theatre will also be studied. Videos, visiting lectures and field trips. Enrollment limited to 16 students.
    Prerequisite(s): THE102  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    THE344: Oral Interpretation

    3 Credit(s)
    Students practice selecting, adapting and arranging a variety of written materials for group and individual performances. Basic vocal training is covered. This is a course for non-majors.
  
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    THE360: Production I

    1-3 Credit(s)
    Extended work as an actor, designer or stage manager in relation to productions presented by the Department of Theatre Arts. Extensive time outside of class is required for rehearsals, tech and performances.
    By audition or permission of the instructor only. Course is repeatable.
  
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    THE361: Production II

    1-3 Credit(s)
    Extended work as an actor, designer or stage manager in relation to productions presented by the Department of Theatre Arts. Extensive time outside of class is required for rehearsals, tech and performances.
    By audition or permission of the instructor only. Course is repeatable.
  
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    THE371: Improvisation

    1 Credit(s)
    Development of fundamental acting skills using the work of Spolin, Johnstone, Del Close and others will be used as a springboard to practice improvisational comedy technique in both short and long form. Students will have performance opportunities during the semester.
    Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required. Course is repeatable.
  
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    THE384: Dramatic Theory and Criticism

    3 Credit(s)
    This course uses major writings in dramatic criticism to address how a production’s concept reflects the historical, social and aesthetic background of the play. Theories of dramatic art and performance will also be studied. Videos, visiting lectures and field trips.
    Prerequisite(s): THE212  and THE241  (may be taken concurrently) or permission of the instructor.
  
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    THE399: Dance Theatre

    1-3 Credit(s)
    Special topics include but are not limited to Playwriting, Creating Devised Theatre, Theatre for Social Justice, Drama, Service Learning Practicum.
  
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    THE402: Performance in Musical Theatre

    1-3 Credit(s)
    The performance skills of acting, voice and dance will be integrated and displayed by the student in the departmental musical production. Extensive time outside of class is required for rehearsals, tech and performances.
    By audition or permission of the instructor only. Course is repeatable.
  
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    THE430: The Business of Acting

    1 Credit(s)
    The career of a professional actor is discussed including auditioning, photos and resumes. Students prepare audition monologues. Designer portfolios are also discussed. Videos, visiting lectures and field trips.
  
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    THE461: Directing Theory and Action

    3 Credit(s)
    experience directing scripted scenes and short plays. Students create a director’s notebook and present their final project to an audience. Extensive time outside of class is required for rehearsals, tech and performance. Enrollment limited to 8 students.
    Prerequisite(s): THE102 , THE241  and THE335 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    THE485: Thesis Preparation

    3 Credit(s)
    Students will choose a theme, research it and compile material to create a showcase for their area of expertise.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior status only.
    Fall Semester.
  
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    THE490: Senior Thesis

    3 Credit(s)
    Senior Theatre majors participate in all areas of theatre production including acting, directing, playwriting and design. Students use found texts and journaling techniques to create a work-in-progress. The material is compiled, collaged and adapted to create a unique project that will be shown to the public.
    Course is repeatable.
  
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    THE491: Observership

    3 Credit(s)
    At least 100 hours are spent with a company or theatre in the United States where students attend rehearsals, observe professionals at work and work in the area of their focus. The course requires submission of a detailed journal and a major paper. Residencies must be approved by the head of the Theatre Arts program.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of five courses in theatre, recommendation of the supervising faculty member, permission of the participating organization.
  
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    THE499: Independent Study in Theatre

    1-3 Credit(s)
    Course work arranged for majors to pursue avenues of learning outside the existing offerings of the department.

Dance

  
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    DNC100: Introduction to Dance

    3 Credit(s)
    Core Requirement in the Visual and Performing Arts
    The material covered in this course encourages students to think broadly and critically about dance as a creative art form.  Class time will be spent primarily in lecture with occasional “movement experiences.”  Students will think about dance from a philosophical and theoretical perspective, exploring the question “what is dance?”  This includes a survey of the role of dance in communication, expression, ritual and religion.  Additionally students will take a look at dance today in contemporary American culture with a specific focus on the controversial implications of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and physicality.  Students will engage in an introduction to movement through creative and improvisational dance techniques, experiencing the course content on both a physical and intellectual level.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC120: Level I Modern Dance Technique

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    The emphasis of this class will be directed toward learning and developing both technical skills and aesthetic sensibilities at a beginning level. The fundamentals of modern dance technique will be stressed along with rhythmic proficiency, breath, performance, and artistry.  Subtle differences in movement quality, energy and rhythm will be explored while working toward increased strength and flexibility.  No previous dance experience is required.  Course is repeatable.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC121: Level I Jazz Dance Technique

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    This course is designed for students to receive an introduction to American Jazz Dance.  Students will survey styles of jazz dance and how they relate to jazz history and American culture.  The study of each style will include technical and stylistic work at a beginning level.  No previous dance experience is required.  Course is repeatable.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC122: Level I Ballet Technique

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    This course is designed for the beginning ballet student with little or no previous experience in ballet technique.  Students will be given a foundation in ballet technique with an emphasis on correct body alignment, musicality, and embodiment of performance style.  Dancers in this class will learn the fundamental exercises that comprise ballet barre and center floor combinations.  No previous dance experience is required.  Course is repeatable.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC123: Tap Dance

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    This course is designed for students to study tap dance at a beginning/ intermediate level. An emphasis will be placed on rhythmic proficiency, coordination, and performance skills.  Course is repeatable.
    Prerequisite(s): Tap shoes are required.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC124: Dance for Musical Theatre

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    This course is designed to introduce the student to a variety of musical theatre styles and techniques, from classic to contemporary. The foundation of the class will be jazz dance technique with an emphasis on style and expression. A workshop on basic tap technique will be taught. Class will consist of a thorough jazz warm-up, across-the-floor progressions and Broadway-inspired combinations.  Course is repeatable.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC125: Hip Hop Dance

    1 Credit(s)
    Course Description: This course is designed for students to study hip hop dance at a beginning/intermediate level.  Course work introduces African Dance, African American Vernacular Dance and hip hop dance in relationship to the broader hip hop culture.
    Course is Repeatable
  
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    DNC126: Conditioning for Dancers

    1 Credit(s)
    This course is designed for students to learn the beginner/intermediate Pilates mat sequence and additional somatic methods which relate to dance technique. Through the choreographed sequence of Pilates exercises students will address their alignment, strength and flexibility. Students enrolled in this class will gain more body awareness and be able to translate that into their dancing and everyday life.
    Dance experience is not a requirement for this class.
  
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    DNC127: Ballroom Dance

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    This course will incorporate lead and follow skills, musicality, basic patterns and variations on timing, technique and style. Beginners welcome. No partner necessary.  Course is repeatable.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC200: Dance History

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed for students to look at dance as a reflection of society and culture from prehistoric societies to the present. Students will focus on dancers, dance styles, dance works and dance literature to increase their understanding of how and why dance has evolved throughout history.
  
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    DNC220: Level II Modern Dance Technique

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    The emphasis of this class will be directed toward learning and developing both technical skills and aesthetic sensibilities at a moderately sophisticated level. The fundamentals of modern dance technique will be stressed along with rhythmic proficiency, performance, and artistry. Subtle differences in movement quality, energy and rhythm will be explored while working toward increased strength and flexibility.  Course is repeatable.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC221: Level II Jazz Dance Technique

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    This course is designed for students to study the historical, philosophical and aesthetic components of American Jazz Dance. Students will be exposed to the different styles of Jazz Dance that exist right now in our culture. These styles include: Classical Jazz, Broadway Jazz, Contemporary Jazz and Lyrical Jazz. The study of each style will include technical and stylistic work. An emphasis will be placed on developing one’s individual style and voice as a jazz dancer.  Course is repeatable.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC222: Level II Ballet Technique

    1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    This course is designed for students to learn and develop both technical skills and aesthetic sensibilities at an intermediate level. It is assumed that students registered in this class will have had some amount of ballet training in order to perform at an intermediate level. Dancers in this class will be exposed to barre work and center work, with an emphasis on correct body alignment, musicality and embodiment of performance style.  Course is repeatable.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC300: Biomechanics and Injury Prevention for Dancers

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores anatomy, biomechanics, and injury prevention within the context of dance techniques. Course work will be divided between lecture and studio classes with a laboratory approach to ballet technique.
  
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    DNC370: Extensions Dance Company

    0-1 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    This course provides the students in Extensions Dance Company with the opportunity to further their training and proficiency by taking an advanced level technique class. The style is to be determined by the instructor. Students participating in Extensions Dance Company must be registered in this class.  Course is repeatable.
    Prerequisite(s): By audition only.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC399: Special Topics

    1-3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement for Visual and Performing Arts
    Special topics include but are not limited to Hip Hop dance.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    DNC400: Choreography

    3 Credit(s)
    Choreography is a class which allows students to examine and practice various styles, methods, histories and the creative processes behind making new dance works. This course will combine physical, creative and scholarly components of dance composition. Students will not only create new, original works on themselves and their peers but will study other contemporary choreographers’ creative processes, learn critical response methods for discussion and feedback about dance, become active and willing participants in improvisation structures and methods, and draw inspiration for dances from various creative sources that they will be exposed to throughout the semester.

Nursing

  
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    NUR130: Medical Terminology

    1 Credit(s)
    Communication between medical specialists and supporting staff requires knowledge of a consistent and reproducible vocabulary. It is important for students to realize that accurate spelling, pronunciation and usage of medical terms is of extreme importance in the care of a patient. This course offers health related personnel a simple approach to the building blocks of medical terminology: roots, prefixes and suffixes. Terminology for basic medical disciplines as well as medical specialties will be included. A variety of commonly used words or phrases for which there are medical terms will be presented.
  
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    NUR150: Introduction to Professional Nursing

    1 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the development of the discipline of nursing and the expectations of the nurse of the future. Topics include nursing history, nursing theories and models of practice, the various settings of practice and the roles of the professional nurse, the social policy statement of the profession, the scope and standards of nursing practice, ethical and legal challenges encountered in practice, and the responsibility of the nurse to communicate appropriately and effectively while advocating for both the patients and the profession.
  
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    NUR216: Health Care Informatics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course establishes the foundational knowledge for understanding and practicing nursing informatics in health care settings. It will explore the impact on patient care within the contemporary health care environment and examine a variety of interactive strategies and technologies used to enhance health care delivery to consumers. Core and supporting models and theories for nursing informatics and the sciences that support nursing informatics are studies. Consideration is given to the use of information technology to support decisions that promote safety and quality in patient-centered care, and concerns about protecting information and system integrity are addressed.
  
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    NUR230: Human Pathophysiology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course includes the concepts of matter, energy, motion of fluids, and electrical impulses from the field of physics as it explores the disruptions of normal physiology and the related signs, symptoms, physical and laboratory findings. The etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and sequelae of various alterations of human structure and function will be examined. Transcultural pathologies will be reviewed as well as pathological conditions that have a higher incidence in humans at specific stages of growth and development.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO105 , BIO106 , BIO207 , CHM121 .
  
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    NUR240: Pharmacotherapy

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introductory study of the principles of drug action and drug therapy in health and illness. Prototypical agents from major drug classifications, routes of administration, standards of care, legislation requirements and nursing responsibilities will be explored. Variation in medication administration policies related to patient variations in gender, age, culture, environmental challenges and diagnoses will be considered. Emphasis is on nursing responsibilities for accurate dosage calculation, patients’ rights in safe administration, and legal considerations in the delivery of medication.
    Prerequisite(s): NUR230 .
  
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    NUR250: Normal and Therapeutic Nutrition

    2 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the science of nutrition. The normal nutritional requirements of humans throughout the lifespan are presented as a basis for planning an adequate diet with consideration for variation in food choices due to social, economic, cultural, ethnic and psychological factors. Health promotion guidelines and patient diet therapy for various genetic and systemic disorders are discussed. Implications of possible interactions between foods, herbal therapies and pharmaceutical therapies will be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM121 .
  
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    NUR332: Holistic Health Assessment and Health Promotion

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on the knowledge, procedures and skills required to perform and document a holistic health assessment, diagnosis and plan of patients from across the lifespan and in various settings. Techniques for assessment of the physical, spiritual, psychological and socio-cultural aspects of a patient are presented with special considerations of unique populations and age groups. Assessment skills may be performed in both the nursing lab and in community settings. The use of the nursing process to assess, determine nursing diagnoses, plan, develop interventions and evaluative procedures for health and wellness promotion, illness prevention, and risk anticipation, and the utilization of referral to colleagues will be included. The systematic approach to documentation will be included in the process.
    Prerequisite(s): All 200 level nursing courses or permission of the chair of the Department of Nursing.
  
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    NUR334: Genetics and Genomics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the advances made in the field of genetics (the study of individual genes) and genomics (the study of all the genes in the human genome) and the application of resulting technologies to patient care. Essentially all human conditions and diseases have a genetic or genomic component. Options for care are increasingly including genetic and genomic information for disease prevention, screening, diagnostic prognosis, selection of treatment and monitoring of treatment effectiveness. Anticipated future research findings and their expected impact on patient care, the possible ethical, fiscal and social justice issues will be considered.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO105  and BIO106 .

  
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    NUR336: Research and Evidence-based Practice

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on the role of the professional nurse as an informed consumer of research and other evidence to facilitate care of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Emphasis is placed on the introduction to the values, characteristics and process of quantitative and qualitative research. The student examines the research process and develops the beginning skills of analysis and critique of nursing research. Emphasis is placed on the development of clinical reasoning by analyzing published studies related to the delivery of nursing care. The professional responsibility to apply findings to direct patient care and develop best practices in nursing care is presented.
    Prerequisite(s): STA201  or STA 173 .
  
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    NUR338: Care of Adults with Chronic Health Conditions

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the knowledge and fundamental skills for holistic nursing care with adults and older adults, women and men from diverse backgrounds living with a chronic illness and the appropriate therapeutic responses based on the patient’s understanding of the risk factors and morbidity common during the aging process. Students will learn how to assess each patient’s personal perception of health, the impact of the chronic illness on the patient and their family, including the common physiological, spiritual, psychological, and social changes, challenges, and adaptations used by adults and older adults. Nursing interventions will integrate critical analysis of clinical findings, evidence-based practice, patient advocacy and teaching, communication, patient safety, and professional functioning within a multi-professional team in order to provide appropriate patient-centered care for patients and their families.
    Prerequisite(s): All 200 level nursing courses, NUR332  and NUR336 .
    Co-requisite(s): NUR339 .
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    NUR339: Experiential Learning: Care of Adults with Chronic Health Conditions

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents students with the opportunity to provide appropriate, safe, holistic nursing care with adults and older adults from diverse backgrounds living with chronic health problems, while also minimizing the occurrence of additional health challenges. Using the nursing process and in collaboration with the patient, students will provide appropriate patient-centered, ethical, cost effective nursing interventions that support the healthy adaptation and well-being of patients and their families at the highest level of independence. Appropriate therapeutic responses will be based on critical analysis of research and evidence-based practice, methods for patient advocacy and teaching, issues of patient safety, clinical reasoning skills, and processes for documentation and communication, and the implementation of the nursing role in a variety of settings and within a multi-professional team.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR338 .

  
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    NUR344: Care of Adults with Acute Health Conditions

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents the knowledge and skills necessary to provide holistic nursing care for adults and older adults from diverse backgrounds experiencing acute health conditions. The appropriate therapeutic responses will be based on the patient’s personal perception of health, understanding of risk factors, morbidity, and mortality common with their acute health condition. Genetic syndromes and the interaction of acute and chronic co-morbid conditions common in older adults will be presented. Students will learn the impact of acute disease on patients and their families, including the common physiological, spiritual, psychological, and social changes, challenges, and adaptations used by adults and older adults. Nursing interventions will integrate critical analysis of clinical findings, research, evidence-based practice, patient advocacy and teaching, communication, patient safety, and professional functioning within a multi-professional team in order to provide appropriate patient-centered care for patients and their families.
    Prerequisite(s): NUR332 , NUR338 , and NUR339 .
    Co-requisite(s): NUR345 .

  
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    NUR345: Experiential Learning: Care of Adults with Acute Health Conditions

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents students with the opportunity to provide appropriate, safe, holistic nursing care of adults and older adults from diverse backgrounds who are experiencing acute health conditions, while also minimizing the potential for the occurrence of additional health challenges. Using the nursing process and in collaboration with the patient, students will provide appropriate patient-centered, ethical, cost effective nursing interventions that support the healthy adaptation and well-being of patients and their families at the highest level of independence. Appropriate therapeutic responses will be based on critical analysis of research and evidence-based practice, methods for patient advocacy and teaching, issues of patient safety, clinical reasoning skills, and processes for documentation and communication, and the nursing roles within a multi-professional team.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR344 .
  
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    NUR346: Families in Transition: Care of Childbearing and Childrearing Families

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents the knowledge and skills necessary to provide holistic nursing care with individuals and their families during the years of childbearing and childrearing. Content includes reproductive issues, pre-natal and postpartum assessments and treatments, and the specialized assessments and interventions required during the intrapartum experience. Knowledge of the growth and development of the child from birth to adolescence, altered patterns in growth and health, and the treatment and rehabilitation of children when they experience a genetic or microbial threat to their well-being will make possible the appropriate care of the patient and their family. Biological, psychosocial, spiritual, and cultural considerations that impact the childbearing and childrearing family are addressed using a family-centered approach. Nursing interventions will integrate critical analysis of clinical findings, research, evidence-based practice, patient advocacy and teaching, communication, patient safety, and professional functioning within an interprofessional team in order to provide appropriate patient-centered care for patients and their families.
    Prerequisite(s): NUR332 , NUR338 , NUR339  and core complement course in Sociology.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR347 .
  
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    NUR347: Experiential Learning: Care of the Childbearing and Childrearing Families

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents students with the opportunity to provide appropriate, safe, holistic nursing care with childbearing and childrearing families from diverse backgrounds. Collaboration with the patient will provide the basis for patient-centered, ethical, cost effective nursing interventions that support the healthy adaptation and well-being of patients and their families in a variety of settings. Appropriate therapeutic responses will be based on the patient’s perception of health and understanding of risk factors, critical analysis of clinical findings, clinical research, evidence-based practice, methods of patient advocacy and teaching, issues of patient safety, clinical reasoning skills, processes for documentation and communication, and the nursing roles within a multi-professional team.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR346 .
  
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    NUR371: Service Learning I

    1 Credit(s)


    In this course students initiate their involvement in processes of health promotion, illness prevention and risk reduction in a collaborative and tangible way within a community. Students connect what they have learned in the classroom to real problems in the world as actively contributing citizens. Service-learning emphasizes collaboration in the development of the goals and objectives of the experience, reciprocal learning between participants, and critical reflection.
    Prerequisite(s): NUR339 , Junior level standing or permission of Chair of Department of Nursing.

     

  
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    NUR432: Care of Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents the knowledge and skills necessary to provide holistic nursing care with patients experiencing abnormal mental health processes and the appropriate therapeutic responses for patients from diverse backgrounds. Genetic syndromes and the interaction of acute and chronic co-morbid conditions common in mental health patients will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the process of assessment of mental health conditions and their impact on patients and their families, including the common physiological, spiritual, psychological, and social changes, challenges and adaptations used. Nursing interventions will integrate critical analysis of evidence-based practice, patient advocacy and teaching, communication, patient safety, and professional functioning within a multi-disciplinary team in order to provide appropriate patient-centered care.
    Prerequisite(s): 300 level nursing courses and core complement in Psychology.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR433 .
  
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    NUR433: Experiential Learning: Care of Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents students with the opportunity to provide appropriate, safe, holistic nursing care to individuals with mental health conditions, while also minimizing the potential for the occurrence of additional health challenges for the patient and their family. Collaboration with the patient will provide the basis for appropriate patient-centered, ethical, cost-effective nursing care to mentally ill patients in a variety of settings. Appropriate therapeutic responses will be based on the patient’s perception of health and understanding of risk factors, critical analysis of clinical findings, clinical research, evidence-based practice, clinical reasoning skills, methods of patient advocacy and teaching, issues of patient safety, processes for documentation and communication, and the nursing roles within a multi-professional team.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR432 .
  
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    NUR436: Care of Families in Transition: Aging and End-of-Life Care

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents the knowledge and skills necessary to provide holistic nursing care of families challenged by the loss of abilities of family members due to aging and the need for end-of-life care, with special attention to issues of quality of life of the patient and family members. Emphasis will be placed on assessment of function, physical, cognitive, psychological, and social changes common in old age, and the complex symptomatology, pain management, and risk factors associated with decline in health status. Attitudes and values that affect care to the aged and the dying process will be explored. Content related to end of life issues for the elderly, including communication, evidence-based practice, cultural expectations, spiritual and religious values, and planning advanced directives will be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): 300 level nursing courses.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR437 .
  
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    NUR437: Experiential Learning: Families in Transition: Aging and End-of-Life Care.

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents students with the opportunity to provide appropriate, safe, holistic nursing care to families with aged members and patients who are approaching the end-of-life, while also minimizing the potential for the occurrence of additional health challenges for patients and their family. Collaboration with the patient will provide the basis for appropriate patient-centered, ethical, cost-effective nursing care to aged individuals, dying patients and their families in a variety of settings. Appropriate therapeutic responses will be based on the patient’s perception of health and understanding of risk factors, critical analysis of clinical findings, clinical research, evidence-based practice, clinical reasoning skills, methods of patient advocacy and teaching, issues of patient safety, processes for documentation and communication, and the nursing roles within a multi-professional team.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR436 .
  
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    NUR442: Care of Adults with Complex Health Conditions

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents the knowledge and skills necessary to provide holistic nursing care with adults and older adults experiencing complex, multidimensional disease processes. Emphasis will be placed on the assessment of a complex health condition, including the physiological, spiritual, psychological, and social adaptations used by patients from diverse backgrounds. Nursing interventions will integrate critical analysis of clinical findings, clinical research and evidence-based practice, patient advocacy and teaching, patient safety, communication and professional functioning within a multi-professional team in order to plan appropriate patient-centered care for individuals and their families.
    Prerequisite(s): 300 level nursing courses.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR443 
  
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    NUR443: Experiential Learning: Care of Adults with Complex Health Conditions

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents students with the opportunity to provide appropriate, safe, holistic nursing care of adults and older adults experiencing complex, multidimensional health conditions, including life threatening critical illnesses, while simultaneously minimizing the potential for the occurrence of additional health challenges. Appropriate therapeutic responses will be based on the patient’s perception of health and understanding of risk factors, critical analysis of clinical findings, clinical research, evidence-based practice, methods of patient advocacy and teaching, communication, and the nursing roles within a multi-professional team.
    Co-requisite(s): NUR442 .
  
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    NUR444: Public Health and Disaster Response Planning

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the student to public health nursing. Epidemiological principles will be utilized in discussing global health issues, environmental health, infectious disease, and health disparities within populations. Concepts of vulnerability to natural and man-made disasters, and the challenges of prevention and health care advocacy for the preparedness of all will be explored within the context of social justice. Community disaster preparation and management will be explored. Local, regional and national preparedness will be evaluated with an emphasis on the effect on the local community. This course may include fieldwork on a public health issue.
    Prerequisite(s): 300 level nursing courses.
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    NUR446: Leadership and Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents concepts of organizational and systems leadership, quality improvement, risk management and patient safety that promote high quality patient care within institutional and community arenas. Principles of leadership and management are discussed with emphasis on the mission and vision of an organization, models of care delivery, and communication across the continuum of care. After analyzing trends and issues in the current health care system, students will determine ways they can provide the leadership required to affect a positive change within the evolving environment of health care. This course may include fieldwork.
    Prerequisite(s): 300 level nursing courses.
  
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    NUR449: Preparation for Licensure I

    1 Credit(s)
    This course provides students with the information, content, and test-taking strategies required to prepare for the computerized testing necessary to obtain licensure. Fall
    Prerequisite(s): Senior majors.
  
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    NUR450: Preparation for Professional Licensure

    2 Credit(s)
    This course provides students with the information, content, and test-taking strategies required to prepare for the computerized testing necessary to obtain licensure.
    Prerequisite(s): Last semester of study in pre-licensure track.
  
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    NUR451: Nursing Capstone

    4 Credit(s)
    This course provides the opportunity for the student to demonstrate synthesis of the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of a developing professional nurse while participating in more autonomous and collaborative clinical functioning within a selected setting. The student will organize, prioritize, and delegate care of patients, as appropriate within a multi-professional system of patient care. Seminar sessions will explore the emerging challenges of professional practice within the particular setting.  Students will write a detailed analysis of a nursing care issue which will include a literature review, proposed solutions to the concern or issue and implications for practice.  
    Prerequisite(s): 300 level nursing courses.
  
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    NUR472: Service Learning II

    1 Credit(s)
    In this course students continue their involvement in processes of health promotion, illness prevention and risk reduction in a collaborative and tangible way within a community.
    Prerequisite(s): NUR371 .
  
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    NUR475: Service Learning IV

    3 Credit(s)
    This service-learning course provides a unique opportunity for students to become involved in an immersion experience. This course will provide an intensive, short-term health care experience within a community either in the United States or abroad.  Open to pre-licensure and degree completion nursing students.
    Theme: Western Heritage

Pell Honors Courses

  
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    PEL299: Special Topics

    3 Credit(s)
    Courses offered in conjunction with departments on a variety of topics each semester.

Philosophy

  
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    PHL120: Logic

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    An introduction to methods and modes of inference, argumentation and persuasion. Basic forms of arguments and criteria for their evaluation are examined. Strategies for applying such knowledge and skills to current issues are suggested.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    PHL125: Philosophy of the Human Person

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course examines the philosophical literature on the question, what it means to be a human person. Topics such as the material and spiritual dimensions of the human person, the immortality of the soul, ethics and human dignity, and individuality and inter-subjectivity or community will be considered.
    Theme: Creative, Aesthetic, Spiritual Experience
  
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    PHL126: The Pre-Socratics, the Sophists, and Socrates

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course will cover the first two periods of ancient Greek philosophy, the cosmological and humanistic periods. An exploration of the dawn of philosophy in Ionia will be followed by a tracing of its development beginning with Thales and covering the main Pre-Socratic thinkers. The shift from cosmology to ethics, politics and the soul will then be explored, including an analysis of the relationship between Socrates and the Sophists.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL130: Ancient Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    A survey of major themes, thinkers, and schools in the Greco-Roman period of Western philosophy.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL140: Medieval Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    A survey of major themes, thinkers, and schools of the medieval era of the Western Tradition.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL141: Medieval Political Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    Students will investigate the most important texts of political philosophers from the medieval era.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL201: Classical Political Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    Students will read and discuss the most important texts of political philosophers, from the origin of political philosophy (Plato and Aristotle), to the impact of Christianity (St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas), to the ultimate break with the classical tradition and the turn toward modern politics (Machiavelli). Cross-listed with  .
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL202: Modern Political Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    Students will read and discuss the most important texts of modern political philosophy. We will examine concepts vital to contemporary politics, such as natural rights, the foundation of legitimate government, justification for revolution, and the protection of individual freedoms. Cross-listed with POL202 .
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL203: Modern Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    A survey of the major themes, thinkers, and schools in the Rationalists, Empiricist, and Idealist traditions.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL204: Contemporary Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    A survey of major themes, thinkers, and schools of the contemporary period spanning the 19th, 20th and 21 centuries in Western philosophy.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL225: Quest for the Good Life

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills PART II of Core Curriculum: Faith and Reason
    This course engages the philosophical and ethical literature seeking answers to the question:  What makes a good life?  We shall explore the roles of reason and faith in the search for the good life and probe subjects such as: happiness, wisdom, justice and other virtues through study of the works of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant and Mill.  In their company, we will have the opportunity to examine our lives and what makes for a life truly worth living.
  
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    PHL230: Plato

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course introduces the student to Plato’s philosophy through an in depth study of one or more of his dialogues.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL231: Aristotle

    3 Credit(s)


    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course introduces the student to topics in Aristotle’s metaphysical and ethical treatises.

     
    Theme: Western Heritage

  
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    PHL233: Islamic Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    A survey of the major themes, thinkers and schools in the Islamic tradition.
    Theme: Global Awareness
  
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    PHL234: Chinese Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    A survey of the major themes, thinkers and schools in Chinese philosophy.
    Theme: Global Awareness
  
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    PHL235: God and the Philosophers

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    The religious faith of countless persons in a personal God has been of perennial interest to philosophers, whether or not they themselves have faith because metaphysical and epistemological questions have consistently been asked, and even answered, by many thinkers over many centuries. Does God exist or not? Does faith in God’s existence, or faith in God’s non-existence, qualify as knowledge? And what is evidence in this sphere? Delving into such metaphysical and epistemological questions, this course will place you in the middle of the debates.
    Theme: Creative, Aesthetic, Spiritual Experience
  
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    PHL236: Philosophy of Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course surveys diverse positions on the subject of justice. Works studied may be selected from the Catholic, classical, liberal, utilitarian, socialist, libertarian and communitarian traditions.
    Theme:: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL237: Science Fiction and Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course uses science fiction literature and film to explore philosophical topics ranging from the nature of reality to the difference between human and artificial intelligence to the ethical questions surrounding genetic enhancement and cloning.
    Theme: Creative, Aesthetic, Spiritual Experience
  
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    PHL242: Thomas Aquinas

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course introduces the student to the philosophical thought of Thomas Aquinas through an in-depth study of one or more of his major works.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL250: Continental Rationalism

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    Students will investigate the important philosophical works of Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL251: British Empiricism

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    Students will investigate the important philosophical works of Berkeley, Locke, Hume and Reid.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL260: Applied Ethics

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    Applies the major philosophical theories of moral goodness and rightness to contemporary moral problems and issues. Areas to be covered could include issues in medical ethics, business ethics, as well as social, political, economic, and legal ethics.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    PHL261: Classic American Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    Beginning with the colonial period and extending to John Dewey, this is a survey of social, moral, and metaphysical ideas that have proved to be significant in the U.S. Cross-listed with AST262 .
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    PHL271: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    A survey of major themes, thinkers, and schools in the Western tradition, from the Greco-Roman through the Medieval and Renaissance periods.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL325: Philosophy of Law

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    An examination of the nature of law from the leading philosophical perspectives. Readings include representative writers from the traditions of natural law, legal positivism, historical jurisprudence, and integrative legal studies. The course centers on law’s commitment to establishing justice and an order integrally directed to the flourishing of the human good. Cross-listed with ADJ325 .
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    PHL333: Reasoning about Race: The Ontology and Ethics of Racial Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course investigates and considers the major philosophical answers to the following questions: Do races exist? If so, what are they? How does racial identity relate to ethnic identity? What is the moral status of race, and how should it figure into our general notions of justice and equality? How should race as a distinguishing or identifying factor between people be used to assess specific policies and institutions? Is there such a thing as institutional racism? If so, how does one identify such an institution?
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    PHL334: Environmental Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    This course explores global environmental issues from a philosophical and social justice perspective. The foundation of environmental justice is built on the premise that all people, regardless of race, class, gender, ethnicity, and economic capacity have a right to a clean and safe environment, and access to adequate natural resources. Global implications of environmental injustices are explored in the context of various ethical frameworks, and reasonable policy initiatives to correct the disparities are discussed and evaluated. Cross-listed with ENV 334 
    Theme: Global Awareness
  
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    PHL335: Philosophy and Art

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Philosophy
    In this course we will investigate and seek answers for the following questions: What is art? What distinguishes it from other forms of symbolic activity and meaning making? What makes for great art? Does it require a certain relationship to beauty or truth? Or can great art be ugly and express falsehoods?
    Theme: Creative, Aesthetic, Spiritual Experience
 

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