2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Jan 24, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English

  
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    ENG372: Fan Culture

    3 Credit(s)
    Cult films, TV series and novels can inspire fierce devotion among audiences.  Fans unite around media texts and fictional characters they love and often produce their own fan fiction, mash-up videos, blogs and other artistic creations.  This course will introduce students to key scholars and theories in the field of fan studies to explore questions such as:  How do fans form virtual communities?  How has the Internet aided the spread of fan cultures?  How does fandom complicate our understanding of media producers and consumers as distinct groups?
  
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    ENG373: Advanced Multimedia Reporting

    3 Credit(s)
    Building on foundational skills in audio and video storytelling, this course teaches students strategies for in-depth reporting for multimedia. Projects will emphasize field reporting, interviewing, and editing for story structure. Through analysis of online video and broadcast news, we’ll explore how the pros make complex stories accessible and engaging for viewing audiences and then apply these techniques to independent projects packaged for the web.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG273 .
  
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    ENG374: Advertising and Consumer Culture

    3 Credit(s)
    Madison Avenue does more than sell products: it sells lifestyles and dreams, values and beliefs. Using a cultural studies approach to media, students will learn critical approaches to analyzing advertisements and will be introduced to the history of the modern advertising industry in relation to the expanding media landscape. Advertising controversies and methods, developments in social media advertising, and international advertising campaigns will also be studied.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG265  or junior standing.
  
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    ENG375: Vienna

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Literature
    At the beginning of the last century, Vienna was the capital of the second largest empire in Europe and exercised a remarkable influence on world culture through its achievements in art, music, literature, architecture, design, psychology, politics and city planning.  Such figures as Sigmund Freud, Johannes Brahms, Gustav Mahler, Alma Schindler, Oscar Kokoschka, Gustav Klimt, Arthur Schnitzler and Theodore Herzl were all contemporaries who lived in close proximity, influencing one another and being influenced and inspired in turn.  In this interdisciplinary course, students will read the literature, hear the music, view the paintings and study the architecture of this city that in many ways gave birth to the modern world in which we live.
    Prerequisite(s): UNV 102  
    Theme: What is Western Heritage?-Ancient and Modern
  
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    ENG376: The World of Jane Austen

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Literature
    This course seeks to explore the world of Jane Austen through her great novels - Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion - with a special focus on the questions of love, marriage, and social class in Regency England.
    Theme: What is Western Heritage?-Ancient and Modern
  
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    ENG378: Great Women Novelists and their Heroines

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Literature
    The emergence of the novel as a new genre in the eighteenth century afforded women a unique opportunity to find their own voice in literature. This course traces the development of that voice down to the present day with special reference to the depiction of women by women.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    ENG397: Special Topics in Film

    3 Credit(s)
    This seminar will provide the advanced student the opportunity to do intensive work in Film Studies. Topics vary, and may include the study of genre, individual directors, screenwriting, film production, or themes/issues.
  
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    ENG398: Special Topics in Literature

    3 Credit(s)
    This seminar will provide the advanced student the opportunity to study a particular author, period, genre, or topic.
  
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    ENG399: Special Topics in Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    This seminar will provide the advanced student the opportunity to do intensive study of a major issue in communications and media. Topics may include, but are not limited to, media and social justice; women’s magazines; television studies; censorship; media and politics; wartime journalism; crisis communications; and media research methods.
  
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    ENG410: British and American Novels after 9/11

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Literature
    This course studies significant American and British novels published after the millennium. Often haunted by the events of 9/11, these novels grapple with the moral and ethical dilemmas occasioned by the realities of our rapidly changing world.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    ENG412: Seminar in Major Authors

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Literature
    Students will give concentrated attention to the work of significant literary figures from different eras, considered either individually or in small groups. Course content will vary by instructor, but may include, for example, Geoffrey Chaucer, John Milton, Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison, Salman Rushdie, and Margaret Atwood.
    Theme: Engaging Creative, Aesthetic and Spiritual Experience
  
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    ENG451: Advanced Creative Writing

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is offered for minors concentrating in Creative Writing. Each student will undertake a manuscript of poems, fiction, or literary nonfiction.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG351  or ENG352  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG453: Special Topics in Creative Writing

    3 Credit(s)
    This seminar will focus on a special topic in creative writing, investigating in-depth a curiosity, wonderment or particular point of craft in fiction, nonfiction, or poetry.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG351  or ENG352  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG480: Public Relations Campaigns

    3 Credit(s)
    This course gives students the opportunity to apply the foundation skills learned in other communications courses to the development and implementation of a real-world public relations campaign. Working with a local client, students will research, set objectives, and identify strategies and tactics for a short-term campaign that they will then implement.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG256  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG489: Critical Writing and Research

    3 Credit(s)
    Foundation Course required of all English and Communications Majors.
    An intensive preparation for research-based and in-depth writing projects, this course provides students with opportunities to explore different theoretical perspectives, improve their skills in research methods and to refine their writing style.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior English major.
  
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    ENG490: Senior Seminar Capstone

    3 Credit(s)
    Foundation Course required of all English and Communications Majors.
    Each student will select a topic or a writer for study and research. The seminar sessions will meet regularly for the presentation and critique of students’ progress. Each student is expected to produce a significant research paper and make an oral presentation and defense.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG489  
  
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    ENG491: Internship

    3 Credit(s)
    Foundation Course required of all Communications Majors.
    Interns work under supervision at local and area newspapers and magazines, public relation firms, non-profit agencies, advertising agencies, and television and radio stations. Literature majors may take this course once for credit toward the major.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of department chair.
  
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    ENG496: Film Theory

    3 Credit(s)
    This course, a required foundation course for the Film minor, concentrates on film theory either as a general overview or focus on certain theoretical approaches, such as auteur studies, postmodernism, feminism, spectatorship, and post-colonialism.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG499: Independent Study

    3 Credit(s)
    Students with compelling reasons may participate in independent study under the direction of a member of the English faculty.
    Prerequisite(s): Students must apply to department chair.

English for Academic Purposes

  
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    EAP103: Academic Communication Skills

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Foreign Language for EAP students
    The focus of this course is to strengthen students’ English language skills, primarily in listening and speaking in academic settings; however, reading and writing skills will also be integrated into the course. The goal is to increase fluency in English in order to be successful in academic studies and social interactions. Students will also enhance their study skills, cross-cultural awareness and conversation skills by completing various in-class activities and homework assignments. This course is required of students enrolled in EAP through the Office of Admissions, and is open to undergraduate students who are non-native speakers of English by permission of the EAP Coordinator. 
    Prerequisite(s): TOEFL score between 500 and 550 (paper-based test), 173-213 (computer-based test), and 61-80 (Internet-based test).
  
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    EAP104: Advanced Communication Skills

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Foreign Languages for EAP students
    The focus of this course is to strengthen students’ English oral communication skills essential to academic success in higher education. Students will increase fluency by preparing for and participating in academic and cultural discussions, completing listening/speaking projects, and by reflecting on ways to increase intercultural communication. Students will also enhance their study skills, cross-cultural awareness and conversation skills by completing assignments. This course is open to undergraduate students who are non-native speakers of English.
    Prerequisite(s): EAP103  or permission of the EAP coordinator
  
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    EAP111: Academic Research and Writing

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Foreign Languages for EAP students
    This course will focus on strategies for academic research and varieties of expository writing for different audiences and situations. Students will improve their proficiency in the English language by developing effective styles of writing paragraphs and essays, culminating in a final research project. They will also expand their understanding of grammatical structures and academic vocabulary. Weekly individual work with a tutor in the EAP program or at the Writing Center is required.  This course is required of students enrolled in EAP through the Office of Admissions, and is open to undergraduate students who are non-native speakers of English by permission of the EAP Coordinator. 
  
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    EAP112: Academic Writing in the Disciplines

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Foreign Languages for EAP students
    This course will focus on strategies for research, reading, and writing in various academic disciplines. Students will improve their proficiency in the English language by developing effective styles of writing essays, analyzing texts, and using appropriate forms of MLA/APA citations. They will also expand their understanding of grammatical structures and academic vocabulary. Weekly individualized work with a tutor in the EAP program or at the Writing Center is required.
    Prerequisite(s): EAP111  or permission of the EAP coordinator.
  
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    EAP399: Special Topics

    1-3 Credit(s)
    Special Topics courses are offered to supplement the educational experience with unique courses that are not part of the normal course offerings.

Environmental Studies

  
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    ENV334: Environmental Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores global environmental issues from a social justice perspective. The foundation of environmental justice is built on the premise that all people, regardless of race, class, gender, ethnicity, and economic capacity have a right to a clean and safe environment, and access to adequate natural resources. Global implications of environmental injustices are explored, and reasonable policy initiatives to correct the disparities are discussed and evaluated.
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    ENV350: Natural Resource Management

    3 Credit(s)
    Natural Resource Management is the field of environmental studies that manages natural resources (land, water, soil, plants, animals) with a goal of improving the quality of life for present and future generations. The course examines the interaction of people and their environment when making decisions that affect the balance between natural resources and social, economic, and other environmental factors. The goal of the course is to introduce students to this very broad discipline through extensive use of case studies and the primary literature.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 140  or BIO 111  and a course in SOA or POL. 
  
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    ENV360: Hydroponics Practicum

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a three-part practicum for any student interested in the biological, economic, and social dimensions of bringing food from farm to table.  Part 1 reviews recent and classic literature on the local food movement. In Part 2, students maintain, cultivate, and harvest hydroponic systems with an emphasis on maximizing yield. For Part 3, they learn through practical experience about the socioeconomic processes involved in bringing produce to market. Students should anticipate spending three hours of class time in addition to three hours in the hydroponic research lab per week. Some weekend time for the farmer’s market is required.
  
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    ENV397: Environmental Studies Internship

    3 Credit(s)
    Environmental Studies Internship is an interdisciplinary experiential course that seeks to give students an introduction to the practicum of work in fields such as biology, planning, economics, public policy, and education. The internship will help the student better understand concepts learned in class while gaining valuable work experience in the field.  The course consists of at least 105 hours of work with an environmental organization that has a cooperative supervisor who has established learning goals and objectives with a faculty member affiliated with the university prior to the commencement of the internship. Open to all students with sophomore standing and above. 
  
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    ENV497: Undergraduate Research

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides in-depth investigation of a specific topic in Environmental Studies that involves data collection, analysis, interpretation, and written presentation. Topic will be determined by faculty member who is acting as research adviser.
  
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    ENV499: Independent Study

    3 Credit(s)
    This supervised study is intended to permit individual students to examine a subject that is not offered in the regular curriculum.

General Studies

  
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    FYT100: First Year Transitions

    1 Credit(s)
    Freshmen
    First Year Transitions is a one credit course designed to help new students transition into university life.  To accomplish this, students will participate in a variety of activities, assignments and discussions to help them locate and use campus resources, set goals, manage time and identify personal health and well-being strategies.  The course will provide a safe place where students will gain important information and skills that are essential in their success in college.  Instructors of the course will serve as the students’ FYT Mentor and will support students during their transition into college life.
  
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    FYT200: Transfer Transitions

    1 Credit(s)
    Transfer Transitions is a one credit course designed to help students make a successful transition into Salve Regina University.  Students will participate in a variety of activities, assignments and discussions  geared towards exploring issues relevant to new transfer students at Salve Regina.  This course introduces students to Salve Regina University and its mission, the various resources and opportunities available campus wide, and strategies essential for achieving academic and personal success in college.  The course will provide a supportive environment for students to connect with other transfer students and gain  important information regarding academic requirements, policies, and resources at the University.
  
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    GST084: Tutoring in the Disciplines: A Workshop for ACE Subject Tutors

    1 Credit(s)
    This workshop is for subject matter tutor in the ACE.
  
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    GST111: Feinstein Enriching America Program

    0 Credit(s)
    Graduation requirement for all students
    The Feinstein Enriching America Program introduces students to opportunities for community service and encourages continuing participation in community service throughout college. As part of the Feinstein Enriching America Program, all undergraduate students complete 10 hours of community service. Normally, this is introduced in the First Year Transitions course. Completion of the 10 hours of service must be documented in the Office of Community Service. The inclusion of GST111 on the student transcript indicates the completion of this graduation requirement.
  
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    GST130: Mentor Practicum

    1 Credit(s)
    This seminar is taken in conjunction with participation in the First Year Experience Student Mentor Program. In addition to co-facilitating a New Student Seminar in the fall, the mentor participates in a one-credit Mentor Practicum seminar. The Practicum provides support, training, debriefing, and updates.
  
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    GST140: Resident Assistant Training I

    1 Credit(s)
    In this course students will learn how to develop and lead a student-centered community in a contemporary college residence hall setting. This is accomplished through the participation in fall, winter and spring RA training workshops, classroom discussions, textbook readings, class projects, and experiential learning. In addition, basic human development theory, counseling, assertiveness and leadership techniques are also discussed and practiced. This course is a one credit per semester class and is graded pass/fail.
    Prerequisite(s): Must be hired as a Resident Assistant.
  
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    GST141: Resident Assistant Training II

    1 Credit(s)
    In this course students will learn how to develop and lead a student-centered community in a contemporary college residence hall setting. This is accomplished through the participation in fall, winter and spring RA training workshops, classroom discussions, textbook readings, class projects, and experiential learning. In addition, basic human development theory, counseling, assertiveness and leadership techniques are also discussed and practiced. This course is a one credit per semester class and is graded pass/fail.
    Prerequisite(s): Must be hired as a Resident Assistant.
  
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    GST300: Study Abroad

    12 Credit(s)
    Registration indicates that a student is participating in a University-approved, full semester, study abroad program. Credit value indicates full-time status and may not reflect actual credits attempted or earned at the host university.
  
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    UNV101: University Seminar I

    3 Credit(s)
    Core Curriculum Requirement
    University Seminar I is focused on engaging new students in a community of scholars focused upon reading, thinking, writing and speaking.  Students choose from a wide range of topics and begin to develop college-level analytical and communication skills to prepare them for academic success and lifelong learning.
  
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    UNV102: University Seminar II

    3 Credit(s)
    Core Curriculum Requirement
    University Seminar II challenges students to deepen the connection between writing and thinking, equip them with the necessary skills to effectively develop ideas and argument through academic writing, and prepares them for a variety of writing that they will encounter throughout the course of their studies at Salve Regina.  Students choose from a wide range of topics for this writing intensive course.
    Prerequisite(s): UNV 101 

Global Studies

  
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    GLO100: Introduction to Global Studies

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to concepts and methods used in the interdisciplinary field of Global Studies. The goal of this course is to develop the skills needed to understand complex problems related to global interconnectedness. The course examines the processes of globalization and their effects on people and cultures, economic and political institutions, and the natural environment from multiple perspectives. Open to non-majors. Spring Semesters
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    GLO399: Special Topics

    3 Credit(s)
    Courses offered on a variety of topics related to the major.
  
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    GLO491: Internship

    3 Credit(s)
  
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    GLO499: Independent Study

    1-3 Credit(s)
    Course work arranged for majors to pursue avenues of learning outside the existing offerings of the department of Cultural, Environmental, and Global Studies.

History

  
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    HIS103: Western Civilization I: 500 B.C.-1500 A.D.

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course covers political, religious and intellectual developments in Ancient Greece, Rome and Medieval Europe.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS104: Western Civilization II: 1500-present

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course covers political, intellectual and religious developments in Western Europe from the Reformation through the fall of the Berlin Wall.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS113: History of the United States to 1877

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This survey course covers political, social, religious, economic and cultural trends in America from the Jamestown settlement in 1607 through the Civil War and Reconstruction.  Topics include the development of slavery, concepts of religious freedom, industrialization and westward expansion.  Special attention is paid to the role Newport played in the Colonial and Revolutionary period.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS114: History of the United States since 1877

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This survey course covers political, social, religious, economic and cultural trends in America from the end of Reconstruction through the end of the Cold War.   Topics include America’s rise as a world power, progressivism, the women’s movement and the civil rights movement.  Special attention is paid to the role that Newport played during the Gilded Age.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS201: Europe 1789-1914

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course analyzes political, intellectual, and cultural developments in western Europe from the start of the French Revolution until the outbreak of World War I.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS202: Europe 1914-1990s

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course analyzes the major political, military, and intellectual developments in Europe since World War I. Special emphasis is placed on the totalitarian movements that threatened Europe for most of the 20th century.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS203: Hitler and the Holocaust

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course examines the mindset of Hitler and his associates and the role that the Final Solution played in Nazi ideology.  The Nazis’ systematic efforts to liquidate Jews and gypsies and their persecution of their religious and political opponents are studied in detail.  Attention is also be given to the resistance and rescue efforts undertaken by the opponents of Nazism both inside and outside of Germany.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS225: Introduction to Public History

    3 Credit(s)
    Public History is the interpretation of the past for popular audiences in nonacademic settings. This course introduces students to the field of public history, including the subfields of museum studies, archival studies, oral history, historic site interpretation and historic preservation. Expert guest speakers, field trips and case studies expose students to a variety of professional career options. Cross-listed with CHP225 .
  
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    HIS251: Sport in America

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the history of sport in the United States in order to better understand American identity. Issues explored include immigration, race relations, religion, class, gender, business, politics and nationalism. Students will have the opportunity to think about how sport mirrors and, at the same time, shapes critical ideas and values in American society. Cross-listed with AST251 .
  
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    HIS265: Modern Global History

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course examines episodes since antiquity where the movement of people, the exchange of ideas and goods, as well as the advancement of technology has influenced politics, culture, science, and identities. From the Babylonian Captivity to Marco Polo and the Internet, inter-cultural exchanges have shaped the modern world. Through the reading of primary and secondary sources, the student will gain a greater understanding of globalization, its historic roots, and its modern impact.
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    HIS270: The Historian’s Craft

    3 Credit(s)


    The course examines the scholarly approaches that leading historians have taken to the discipline. It considers how historians analyze and interpret source materials and explores the ethical challenges that they sometimes face. Over the course of the semester, students will visit area archives and conduct research using both primary and secondary sources.

     
    Prerequisite(s): Open to History majors and minors with sophomore standing.

  
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    HIS297: Special Topics in European History

    3 Credit(s)
    These intermediate-level courses are offered when interest is generated and departmental resources are available.
  
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    HIS298: Special Topics in Non-Western History

    3 Credit(s)
    These intermediate-level courses are offered when interest is generated and departmental resources are available.
  
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    HIS299: Special Topics in American History

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    These intermediate-level courses are offered when interest is generated and departmental resources are available.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS306: Modern Germany

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course concentrates on 20th century developments after a brief survey of aspects of German history before 1914 that have had an enduring effect. Special emphasis is given to Hitler and the World War II era.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS308: Modern France

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course considers the major political, intellectual, and cultural currents in France since 1789. The course first briefly studies the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV and then closely examines developments from the French Revolution to the present.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS309: Modern Russia

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course concentrates on the Soviet Union through its transformation into the Russia of the early 21st century, after a brief survey of those aspects of Russian history from the time of Peter the Great that have had an enduring effect on Russia in the contemporary era.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS310: Modern England

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course considers the major political, intellectual and cultural developments in England since 1776. The course begins with a brief consideration of the Tudor, Stuart, and Georgian periods and then closely examines English life in the 19th and 20th centuries.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS311: Modern Ireland

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course considers political, religious, cultural and economic developments in Ireland since 1798. Special emphasis is placed on the violence that has plagued Northern Ireland from the 1960s-1990s.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS312: Modern Italy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course considers the major developments in Italy since the 1790s. The course begins with a brief account of the early modern period and then examines events of the 19th and 20th centuries, especially the struggle for unification and Mussolini’s fascist dictatorship. Attention is also paid to the Italian influx into America and the reception that the immigrants received.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS313: American Immigrant Experience

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    An examination of the experiences of the major immigrant groups from the Puritans to the Third World peoples of the present day. Special emphasis is placed on the European immigrant waves of the nineteenth century and on the experiences of African Americans before and after Emancipation.  The course considers each group’s efforts to adapt to America and the ambivalent and sometimes hostile reaction that they received from native-born Americans.  Cross-listed with AST 313  
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with permission of instructor.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS316: American Economic History

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    From Colonial Jamestown’s commercial enterprises in the early 17th century to the global e-commerce of the early 21st century, economic forces have shaped the American experience. This course surveys the history of economic America from 1600 to the present. It explores the historic origins of economic growth and change, including: Colonial trade and the American Revolution; early manufacturing and westward expansion; slavery and industrialization; labor and unionization; the welfare state; and globalization. Cross-listed with ECN316 .
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with permission of instructor.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS320: The American Revolution

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course examines the American Revolution from its origins in the mid- 18th century through the ratification of the Constitution. The course explores such topics as the political, economic, and ideological factors leading to the Revolution; the major battles and military figures of the war for independence; the significance of the American Revolution in the global context; the Revolution’s radical impact on America’s political and social order; and the legacy of the Revolution within American society and culture as well as Western Civilization. Particular attention is given to the experience of Rhode Island and Newport during the revolutionary era.
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with permission of instructor.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS321: America’s Civil War

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    The Civil War preserved the Union, ended slavery in America, and modernized the American republic and economy. This course will introduce students to the Civil War era beginning with the economic, social and political origins of the conflict during the antebellum period; continuing with the political, military, diplomatic, and social history of the war years; and ending with an exploration of how Americans remember the Civil War today.
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with permission of instructor.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS322: Urban America

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    A survey of urban America from the 17th through the 20th centuries that examines the impact of the city upon American history, culture and quality of life. Special emphasis is given to urban developments in the 20th century. Cross-listed with AST322 .
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with permission of instructor.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS324: American Political Thought

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences
    This course traces the great ideas that have shaped the political history of America from its origins in English liberalism to contemporary debates over progressivism. By examining material from political, historical, and literary sources, this course surveys the dominant ideas of each epoch and the moral systems that underpin them. Cross-listed with POL324 .
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with permission of instructor.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS331: Contemporary Latin America

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences
    Central and South America and the islands of the Caribbean are discussed in terms of economic development, political and social reform, the military elite, and church-state relations. Cross-listed with POL331 .
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    HIS332: Contemporary Middle East

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences
    The Middle East is examined as a problem area in international relations. Emphasis is placed upon problems of Arab nationalism, Arab unity, and the economic modernization of representative countries of the region. Cross-listed with POL332 .
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    HIS333: Contemporary Africa

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences
    This course is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of independent African states. Attention is directed to the social, geographic, and economic settings; to the colonial experiences; and to the contemporary political situation. Cross-listed with POL333 .
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    HIS334: Contemporary Asia

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Social Sciences
    This course focuses on the modern politics and history of Asia, one of the most important and rapidly changing regions in the world. Special attention is given to China, Japan, and India. Topics include the effects of traditional cultures on modern politics, the rise of nationalism, democracy and authoritarianism, economic change, and international relations in the region.
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    HIS336: Vietnam War

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    The Vietnam War is examined from the perspective of both the Americans and the Vietnamese. After a survey of developments in Southeast Asia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the course concentrates on the war of independence from France, the struggle for unification against the United States, and the aftermath of that war into the present.
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    HIS340: History of Warfare

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    The course surveys military history of the United States within a global context from America’s colonial wars in the 17th century through the American conflicts in the Middle East in the 1990’s. Although this course emphasizes warfare on land, it also includes the study of naval and air warfare. Each American war is examined including major battles and military leaders, the impact of war on society, and the global influence of American military power.
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with instructor’s permission.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS390: Historical Research Methods

    3 Credit(s)
    This course helps prepare students for the Senior Seminar (HIS490). Over the course of the semester, students strengthen their research and writing skills and begin working on their thesis topics.
    Prerequisite(s): History majors with junior standing.
  
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    HIS397: Special Topics in European History

    3 Credit(s)
    These upper-level courses are offered when interest is generated and departmental resources are available.
    Theme: Western Heritage
  
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    HIS398: Special Topics in Non-Western History

    3 Credit(s)
    These upper-level courses are offered when interest is generated and departmental resources are available.
    Theme: Building Global Awareness
  
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    HIS399: Special Topics in American History

    3 Credit(s)
    These upper-level courses are offered when interest is generated and departmental resources are available.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS403: Modern America

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course considers political, social, and economic aspects of American life from World War II to the present. Emphasis is given to cultural change, and the impact of national and international events on the lifestyle of the average American.
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with instructor’s permission.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS415: Modern American Foreign Policy

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    An examination of America’s leadership role on the international scene from World War II to the present, with an analysis of the interrelationship of domestic and foreign issues. Cross-listed with POL415 .
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with instructor’s permission.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS422: American Presidency

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in History
    This course provides an explanation of the institutional and political evolution of the presidency with an emphasis on the nature of presidential power in domestic and foreign affairs. Attention is also given to institutional conflicts with Congress and the Courts. The nature of presidential leadership and personality is also explored. Cross-listed with POL422 .
    Prerequisite(s): Open to students with sophomore standing or with instructor’s permission.
    Theme: Defining the American Experience
  
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    HIS490: Senior Thesis Capstone

    4 Credit(s)
    This is the capstone course of the History Department. In this class students sharpen their research, writing and public speaking skills as they complete and publicly present a thesis based on their original research.
    Prerequisite(s): Open to History majors with senior standing. 
  
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    HIS491: Internship

    3 Credit(s)
    Students work for a staff member at a local historical society, library, archive or museum on one or more projects and complete a research paper related to the history of Newport or the subject of their internship.
    Prerequisite(s): The internship is open to junior and senior History majors with the permission of the advisor.
  
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    HIS499: Independent Study

    3 Credit(s)

Mathematical Sciences

  
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    MTH170: Concepts in Mathematics

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Mathematics
    This course stresses the breadth of mathematics both continuous and discrete, probabilistic as well as deterministic, computational and conceptual while providing students with tools needed to investigate, explore and understand the thematic connections that exist between discipline-based courses. Students investigate appropriate mathematical subject matter drawn from areas such as graphs and networks, the concept of change, combinatorics and probability, modern algebra and number theory. In addition to considering mathematical concepts that are the foundations of these areas in mathematics, students investigate applications of mathematics.
  
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    MTH171: Mathematics in the Social Sciences

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Mathematics
    Students study some of the great achievements and concepts in the discipline of mathematics. This course stresses the breadth and application of mathematics in the context of the social sciences while providing students with tools needed to investigate, explore and understand the thematic connections that exist between discipline-based courses. Students employ appropriate mathematical concepts to investigate questions related to such issues as voting systems, apportionment of representation and fair division of resources. In addition to considering mathematical concepts that are the foundation of these areas, students investigate applications of this mathematics.
  
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    MTH172: Quantitative Methods for Business

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Mathematics
    Students study some of the great achievements and concepts in the discipline of mathematics along with their use in the analysis and solution of business problems. Students study the mathematics of finance, decision analysis, project management, and demand forecasting. Students study and apply the mathematical concepts related to expected value decision making and linear programming. Students also study exponential, trend adjusted, and seasonal forecasting as well as quantitative financial concepts such as interest, discounts, annuities, and present value analysis.
  
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    MTH173: Discrete Mathematics

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Mathematics
    This is a course in the foundations of mathematical ideas that underlie the science of computing.  The topics that are explored are logical operations, relations and arguments, mathematical induction and recursion, set relations and operations, combinatorics, elementary graph theory, algorithms and computation, and number theory with applications to cryptography.  
  
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    MTH191: Applied Calculus

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Mathematics
    Students study topics that include functions, models, and average rate of change, limits, instantaneous rates of change, the derivative, differentiation techniques, applications of the derivative, and a brief introduction to integration.
    Prerequisite(s): High school algebra II.
  
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    MTH195: Calculus I

    4 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirements in Mathematics
    This course covers the following topics: limits and continuity, the derivative, finding and interpreting the derivative, graphing and optimization, integrals of a function of one variable, the fundamental theorem of calculus, integration by parts.  The level and pace of this course are generally greater than those of the Applied Calculus course (MTH 191 ), and some proofs of important theorems are studied.
    Prerequisite(s): High School precalculus or equivalent.
  
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    MTH196: Calculus II

    4 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Mathematics
    This course covers the following topics: techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, parametric equations and polar coordinates, vectors and the geometry of space, functions of several variables, and partial derivatives.  Some proofs of important theorems are studied.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 195   or equivalent, or MTH 191   with consent of instructor.  
  
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    MTH203: Calculus III

    4 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Mathematics
    This course covers the following topics: applications of partial derivatives, multiple integrals, vector fields, divergence and curl of a vector field, line and surface integrals, Green’s Theorem, Divergence Theorem and Stokes’ Theorem and their applications.  Some proofs of important theorems are studied.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 196   or equivalent.   
  
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    MTH211: Linear Algebra

    3 Credit(s)
    Fulfills Core Requirement in Mathematics
    This course covers the following topics: matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and applications. Historical notes are included throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 196   or equivalent.  
  
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    MTH213: Differential Equations

    3 Credit(s)
    This course covers the following topics: first-order ordinary differential equations, higher-order linear differential equations, stability and phase plane analysis, Laplace transformations, series solutions, numerical methods, and applications. Historical notes are included throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 196   or equivalent, and MTH 211   or consent of instructor.  
  
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    MTH315: Geometry

    3 Credit(s)
    Students study concepts of geometry. In particular, students study Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Historical notes are included throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 196  or consent of instructor.  
  
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    MTH399: Special Topics

    1-3 Credit(s)
    The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to investigate topics not covered in ordinary course work. The subject matter varies to suit the students and the interests of the professor.
  
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    MTH411: Analysis I

    3 Credit(s)
    Topics are chosen from functions of one and several variables, differentiation and Riemann integration, and sequences and series of numbers.  Historical notes are included throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 173   and MTH 203 . 
  
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    MTH412: Analysis II

    3 Credit(s)
    Topics are chosen from metric and normed spaces, sequences and series of functions, and complex variables.  Historical notes are included throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 411  
 

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